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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My five year old son and I are finally the proud caretakers of a beautiful 1935 model B and have a few questions for people much more knowledgeable than I on the subject. I followed the parts link that Lovesthedrive provided in the stickied thread - thank you very much for that - and found the "676 - Model B and Model BR - BO Tractors (Not Styled)" parts listing and now have it saved locally.

Reviewing page #34 of the guide it seems to indicate that there are two different types of fenders available for my tractor and I wanted to ask if any of you had a different reference point on each of the two types such as photographs or even a different line drawing as it seems that the two are in fact different in shape and volume with the "1C" version being substantially larger than the "1D" version. I'd also like to ask if any have any insight as to which variation was the most commonly used on machines that had them installed.

Also, the previous owner/restorer disabled the small fuel tank and removed the three-way fuel cock and the tractor runs solely on gasoline now. I understand the reason this modification was performed but for the sake of "historical interest" I wanted to ask if those removed fuel system parts are easy to lay hands on or were they summarily discarded by most and now fall into the "hens teeth" category? I don't know if I would ever utilize the smaller rear fuel tank but I think I'd like to see it plumbed into the system correctly if sourcing the fuel cock isn't cost prohibitive.

Thank you for the forum and I look forward to learning more from you as we enjoy taking care of our own little piece of history.

For reference we have a 1935 Model B "unstyled" SN: B9814 -EDIT-(XX's here initially as I forgot the SN but a quick browse through our pictures reminded me)

Best wishes,
GT Whitlow
 

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if I get one in that needs work, ill hook up both tanks then fill them both with gas. now when your out in the field or doin a parades and run out of gas you have a reserve tank! trust me seems as these old tractors run out of gas more then one would think :lol:
 

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if I get one in that needs work, ill hook up both tanks then fill them both with gas. now when your out in the field or doin a parades and run out of gas you have a reserve tank! trust me seems as these old tractors run out of gas more then one would think :lol:
Makes complete sense to me and I would actually like to re-utilize the second tank for the same reasons to add that safety net for when the fun outlasts the fuel supply, but I'm told that the three-way was removed by many due to being a leak point - I accept that I may have been told wrong - but I'd really like to source one all the same and see about getting it restored and put it into service.

Best wishes,
GT Whitlow
 

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-Willy-
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I am glad you found that link useful. That link was gleemed from a forum about John Deere Crawlers.

As to your desire to have fenders? Well that is very iffy. I believe you will find that you are the odd man out there as being the only person WITH fenders. Most tractor owners dont bother to have them on there. So do you need them? No. What were the holes for then? Well the John Deere tractor was made to run many things. Just because there are holes for bolts or other items does not mean they MUST have something in them. Heck, my 60 has the bolts where the fenders may have been, yet for my size they would impede my ability to get onto the tractor.

The tractors that do have fenders are of later years. Mainly tractors that would have worked in the orchards. Yet as I myself learned from some one whom had a New Holland before myself, fenders can be a real nuissance. Sani Salsbury got the tractor and put the Ford 8n type fendors on it. The reason was that when he went bush hogging the other type of fender would get in the way. I wanted the new style as it was the place where a tractor with no cab had lights mounted. In my book you have lights on the premise that some day you will want to get home and it will be too dark to see. So if you want to be the only person whom has fenders and really want to throw your money away, go for it. It is after all your tractor.

As to where to get the parts for the original tank and valve? I would try to go through some one like McGrew Tractors. They are a salvage yard and may have what you need or have one that will fit. You can find them online at http://mcgrewtractorparts.com .

Let us know how you make out (regardless of what I have written). Also dont forget to share pictures. We always like to see everyone elses tractor.
 

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GT, you didn't ask for this information about your B, serial # 9814, but here it is anyway. 9814 was built and shipped on 8/26/1935. It went to Kansas City, MO. There is a further destination code of T47208, but I don't know what that means. There is no powerlift # listed, so it must be a "flat-back." This info comes from the B registry published by 2-Cylinder magazine.

Lon
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I am glad you found that link useful. That link was gleemed from a forum about John Deere Crawlers.

As to your desire to have fenders? Well that is very iffy. I believe you will find that you are the odd man out there as being the only person WITH fenders. Most tractor owners dont bother to have them on there. So do you need them? No. What were the holes for then? Well the John Deere tractor was made to run many things. Just because there are holes for bolts or other items does not mean they MUST have something in them. Heck, my 60 has the bolts where the fenders may have been, yet for my size they would impede my ability to get onto the tractor.

The tractors that do have fenders are of later years. Mainly tractors that would have worked in the orchards. Yet as I myself learned from some one whom had a New Holland before myself, fenders can be a real nuissance. Sani Salsbury got the tractor and put the Ford 8n type fendors on it. The reason was that when he went bush hogging the other type of fender would get in the way. I wanted the new style as it was the place where a tractor with no cab had lights mounted. In my book you have lights on the premise that some day you will want to get home and it will be too dark to see. So if you want to be the only person whom has fenders and really want to throw your money away, go for it. It is after all your tractor.

As to where to get the parts for the original tank and valve? I would try to go through some one like McGrew Tractors. They are a salvage yard and may have what you need or have one that will fit. You can find them online at http://mcgrewtractorparts.com .

Let us know how you make out (regardless of what I have written). Also dont forget to share pictures. We always like to see everyone elses tractor.
I appreciate your insight and understand that most were sold without fenders as I imagine they would have been considered a frivolous expense. I personally want them to provide a level of safety for my boy and wanted to know if one type provided more coverage from the platform side as there will come a time when he will be big enough to safely ride around the property on it. The question as to which was more popular was mostly for historical curiosity. Thanks for the parts source, I'm going to be fooling around with it as is for a bit but the more I think about it the more I want to go ahead and reactivate that portion of the fuel tank so sources like that will certainly become invaluable to me.

GT, you didn't ask for this information about your B, serial # 9814, but here it is anyway. 9814 was built and shipped on 8/26/1935. It went to Kansas City, MO. There is a further destination code of T47208, but I don't know what that means. There is no powerlift # listed, so it must be a "flat-back." This info comes from the B registry published by 2-Cylinder magazine.

Lon
Genuine thanks for that Lon, the tractor came to us from Missouri so that location information makes sense. Question, for the uninitiated like myself, what does the term "flat-back" represent? I finally got to take a few more pictures and have them uploaded to share. Please pardon the mess in the shop.























My son, and future operator.


Best wishes,
GT Whitlow
 

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Not a flat back as there is a power lift on it, also has a PTO.
 

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-Willy-
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Thought you said you didnt have the secondary tank on it. I see two tanks and two caps. As to the valve a 3 way valve from a parts store will do. Otherwise you could ask a John Deere dealer if they can still get you one.
 

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Very nice looking JD tractor! You son looks very happy to be part of your hobby. Thanks for posting the pictures.
Regards,
Chris
 

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GT, the term flat-back is used to describe a tractor that only has a pto on the back. It does not have a power-lift to raise and lower a mounted implement, like cultivators. The power-lift is those 2 square shafts about 1 3/4" square, one on each side, and pedals that can be stepped on with a heel as you are sitting in the seat. Power-lifts are only used to lift. If you step on the pedals and nothing happens, grab a big cresent and turn the square shafts down. Then when you step on the pedals, they should turn upwards. The power-lift that you have is not the one that would have come on a '35 B. It should only have one small pedal. Someone has added the power-lift, as it did not leave the factory with one

Lon
 

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Stiener has the reproduction 3 way fuel valve, and probably the control rod, the parts link that LTD posted should show somewhat how it was routed.
 
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