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I only got away from our booth for just a few minutes late in the day. I managed to get a few shots.
The tobacco stick mill was back and powered by a recently purchased Farmall H and the mill owner's father's Farmall A.



My JD 40S







Pre-revoluntionary War Encampment

Apple Cider Place and Cider Presses


 

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Thanks Jim for sharing that. I spied that John Deere
40 right of. One like Henry bought new years ago.
 

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bettyp said:
Thanks Jim for sharing that. I spied that John Deere
40 right of. One like Henry bought new years ago.
Good eye Betty. I remember yall's JD too. :D
 

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Looks like you all had some nice tractors at the show and I like the bootlegger at the end of the tobacco display. I'd also like to see that stick mill work. Just had a thought did you all sharpen your sticks or leave them flat on the end?
 

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gordon1121 said:
Looks like you all had some nice tractors at the show and I like the bootlegger at the end of the tobacco display. I'd also like to see that stick mill work. Just had a thought did you all sharpen your sticks or leave them flat on the end?
Sticks for flue-cured baccer were flat on the ends. The stick of cured leaves on the stringing buck or horse are held on with tobacco twine. There were usually 28 to 32 hands on a stick. There is a row of hands on each side of the stick. The string is tied to the end farthest from the person stringing. Hands generally of 3 leaves are passed to the stringer by "handers". The butt ends of the leaves need to be straight. String is wrapped around a hand and the next hand is put on the other side of the stick until the stick is filled. A good stringer with 2 good handers could do a stick a minute.
 
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