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Discussion Starter #1
I have an sometimes, but not all of the time (which in itself is weird) fluid leak coming from my hydraulic pump. This has been a problem dating from 1995, when I got the tractor. It is the line nearest the dash, which has the compression fitting. This is probably the return line as there is a steady drip, not a high pressure squirt. A new fitting has been installed 2 or 3 times. The one in there is only 2 years old. As I said above, it will go for months dry as a bone, then start dripping fluid pretty steady. Of course it is worse when the tractor has been run some and gotten the oil hot.

Anybody out there have a similar problem?
 
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Did you just change the fitting that the line hooks to?? The ferrul's are common for causing the leak. If so you may need to replace the tube unless you have enough line to cut it behind the ferrul and put a new one on.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yes, the fitting from tube to pump is fairly new. Looking inside the old fitting I can see rubber, which I guess acts as a ferrule. Don't know if it is (was) an "O" ring or shaped like a ferrule. The tubing is in really good shape with no roughness or dings in it. Don't know if there is enough excess to cut off and retry.

As I said, this has been a recurring problem over the years. Just wondering if anyone else has this problem?
 
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Is there anyway you can snap a picture of the fittin and inside the end of the tube??? Might need to see it to help any further.
 

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one line has the compression nut.. the other an oring.

either can leak.. if the compression tube gets marked fromt eh nut.. it will never seal good. some people bandaid it with a couple wraps of tef tape then mash the nut down on it.. or even an oring...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Update on the leak. A new fitting runs around $35 ouch! My dealer has a more permanent fix, which is what I was hoping for. He can get a rubber line with the correct adapter to attach to the pump on one end. On the other end he cuts the steel line and brazes a fitting to it. Then he connects the hose to it. Should be a better solution. A little pricey, it will run around $150-175. But, I am glad to pay that to eliminate the constant leak and aggravation.
 
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BIGHOSS said:
Update on the leak. A new fitting runs around $35 ouch! My dealer has a more permanent fix, which is what I was hoping for. He can get a rubber line with the correct adapter to attach to the pump on one end. On the other end he cuts the steel line and brazes a fitting to it. Then he connects the hose to it. Should be a better solution. A little pricey, it will run around $150-175. But, I am glad to pay that to eliminate the constant leak and aggravation.
Check with a hydraulic hose store. They can make a hose to attatch to the pump fintting then the other end would be a crimp on the hose that has a nut and ferrul. You cut the tube straight and put that end over the tube and tighten it down. Take your pump fitting with so they can see it. Also let them know what the O.D. of the tubing is. I've done many like this. No where's near $150. Should be able to do it for less than $50 depending on the size of steel line you have.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Because now instead of a small drip there is a steady stream of oil pouring out. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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usually it's a worn comp nut.. but eventually the hardline imprints and then will never seal up good without major jiggering up.. or repalcement of parts. while i don't like to replace expensive parts more than anyone else.. nor do I like to convert to non oem due to making a repair later on harder.. I like both of those better than a farmerized fix theat may leave me stranded later on.

I know a few guys that have used combinations of orings and white packing tape ( teflon ) and or jb weld to fix those leaks.. put tape on then nut.. the coat with jb then tighten and let cure.

usually does work actually.. makes disassy a pain though! I've had to go after that kind of fix and chip off jb weld to get the vomp nut out. had to do that on a fuel line someone jb welded in vs chaning out an oring one time . :(

10 cent oring.. and someone just tightened tha bajeebers out of the packing nut and then slathered about 4 coats of jb on her to stop a diesel drip.

well.. it worked.. till i needed to take a fuelbowl assy off the OTHER side of the line and had no rom to do so onthe hardline.. :)

that one shoulda been a 5m fix and turned into 3 hrs. had no room to work so had to use a razor knife int he space a wrench would go and slowly wittle off jb till i go thte packing nut to turn onthe 5/16 line.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Update on the tubing leak. First remove the high pressure tubing. This in itself in hard to do. The foot rest, parking brake, and then the tubing has to come off. The fix was to use a male jic fitting, already attached to a short piece of steel tubing (about 8"). An adapter was then used that had correct threads to fit the pump (still don't know what thread it is) and female jic on the other end for the new tubing section. Cut off the end of the original steel tube and join to the new tube using a steel tube with id to match the od as a coupler. After several dry fittings, the coupler was brazed on each end to the tubes. This took over 2 hours as the assembly being rigid has to be right on the money to be able to attach to the pump. But, they were able to make it work. No leaks.

If I were doing another, I think that it would be much easier to have a good hydraulic hose shop attach a short hose to the cutoff steel tube with the correct fittings on the other end to fasten to the pump. This gives much more flexibility than the rigid steel line.

Replacing the steel line completely with rubber probably would not work because of the limited space beneath the step at the back.

As this was done at our local Ford dealer, I was able to look at several other tractors there. Looks like a change to a jic fitting was done on the later models.

I hope that this is clear to everyone. I meant to make some pics of the process, but forgot the camera.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Here are some pics of the fix.
Looking at new fitting and one end of brazed coupler from LH side.




Old fitting. Notice the rubber inside for sealing. Not a very good seal for high pressure hydralics.


As I already said, if I had to do another one, I would take the steel tubing off and go to a good hydraulic hose place and have them connect a short 8-10" hose to tube with the correct fitting on the pump end.
 

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actually.. it made it how long? i'd say ruber seals are fine for sealing high pressure.

lots of fittings running around today handling 2500psi range pressures.

ORB /ORFS

the piston in the 3pt uses a rubber ring.. etc...
 

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Discussion Starter #20
This is the 3rd or 4th failure since buying the 3000 in 1995. There was always a small drip of oil evey now and then. I agree that rubber O rings are used sucessfully in just about all applications for sealing hydraulics. But, I would not call this an O ring. It is just a big hunk of rubber that resembles a washer. The only way to seal is to tighten the steel fitting to try compressing it. My experience tells me that the $150 was money well spent. By the way, the dealer price for the old fitting is now $35 plus sale tax.

And as I said earlies, the later series changed over to a jic type fitting.
 
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