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Discussion Starter #1
I bought an un-styled Allis Chalmers WC speed patrol. The serial number is 74311. The last W.C. un-styled W.C. tractor made was 74330.
That puts my tractor 18th from the last WC un-styled tractor made.
The reason I'm asking is because the original owner passed down talk that it was the last un-styled speed patrol grader made. Are more precise records available.
It dont really make it any different because all they did was put some style in the Sheetmetal in 1940.
Just curious.
I have been rebuilding the carb and magneto and located some rear tires. I hope to drive it up on the trailer instead of winching it on.
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Any knowledge is welcome and appreciated. Im new to the Allis Chalmers ,WC model.

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If I were a betting man I'd wager it was the last unstyled Speed Maintainer.
There should be another serial number stamped on the grader part, but I have no idea where.
TractorData.com Allis Chalmers WC Speed Maintainer tractor information
Even if it's not, you have found a very unique piece and in very good condition for it's age.
A styled Road Maintainer would be even more rare.
I would be very interested in what you find. Keep us updated on your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
This is where it gets a little off on accurate information. My tractor does have the tag on the front frame that says 1E-16 0 or 1E-160. So that makes it after the 1940 model change.
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During the model change some un-styled may have been in inventory and used. I dont see any indication that this was changed over. The original paint on the underside of the frame looks original.
The early ones like mine have the front extension added on. Later the had a full length channel frame.

Your link shows mine in 1940
.http://www.tractordata.com/industrial-tractors/000/2/4/245-allis-chalmers-wc-speed-maintainer.html

Here is a link to a very perfect styled Speed Maintainer

I havn't seen a styled Road Maintainer
 

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The serial number starting with 1E does make it an early speed patrol other than a late maintainer.
Since the tractor change was late '38 and the speed patrol started in '40, my guess would be that tractor was waiting for a bit before the grader was put on.
It's still not uncommon for things like that. I live close to an Altech factory where they build and put bucket and boom beds on trucks.
I've seen trucks sit for more than a year in their lot waiting. Still makes it a very unique piece, and I would bet there's not many left around.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dave
I'm leaning toward what you say as being a probability. In the machinery world things weren't set in stone. I have only found photos of two un-styled Speed maintainer graders. Somewhere I read that between 1933 and 1940 there were somewhere around 750 speed maintainers made before the name change to Speed Patrol.
I have only found photos of two online.

I'm going to give this one an automotive enamel paint job. I hate the way tractor paint fades so fast to pink. I've been an IH guy for years so know about fading.
The gas tank is flawless. The hood is fair. I was walking down the path out to the tractor and there was two un-styled fenders sitting on a skid. They are in good repairable condition with small dents. I'm going to drill out the rivets to make the body work on those easier. On some tractors I leave the war scars and dont always paint.
This tractor deserves the slick look.
If you think about many of this model didnt get the daily use of a regular tractor but long driveways and gravel roads were more common back then.

Someone chopped up the standing platform but I found one of those also. Its leaning against the rear axle in the above photo.

I missed out on buying one of these about 35 years ago and have always kicked myself for hesitating to lay out the cash.
I need to get some tires mounted to get it loaded on a trailer and get it home. I'm anxious.
Still get like a kid with a first car even after buying 20 or more tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Dave
I'm leaning toward what you say as being a probability. In the machinery world things weren't set in stone. I have only found photos of two un-styled Speed maintainer graders. Somewhere I read that between 1933 and 1940 there were somewhere around 750 speed maintainers made before the name change to Speed Patrol.
I have only found photos of two online.

I'm going to give this one an automotive enamel paint job. I hate the way tractor paint fades so fast to pink. I've been an IH guy for years so know about fading.
The gas tank is flawless. The hood is fair. I was walking down the path out to the tractor and there was two un-styled fenders sitting on a skid. They are in good repairable condition with small dents. I'm going to drill out the rivets to make the body work on those easier. On some tractors I leave the war scars and dont always paint.
This tractor deserves the slick look.
If you think about many of this model didnt get the daily use of a regular tractor but long driveways and gravel roads were more common back then.

Someone chopped up the standing platform but I found one of those also. Its leaning against the rear axle in the above photo.

I missed out on buying one of these about 35 years ago and have always kicked myself for hesitating to lay out the cash.
I need to get some tires mounted to get it loaded on a trailer and get it home. I'm anxious.
Still get like a kid with a first car even after buying 20 or more tractors.
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I gave 250 for the pair. There are some on ebay for a b for $ 500 I guess they are getting scarce.
 

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I understand your excitement. One sees that diamond through the rough and can't wait to polish it out.
Especially with a piece like this. I have never even seen another photo of an unstyled Speed Patrol, let alone one in person.
Keep us updated on your progress, and if you come across any more history behind it.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
I understand your excitement. One sees that diamond through the rough and can't wait to polish it out.
Especially with a piece like this. I have never even seen another photo of an unstyled Speed Patrol, let alone one in person.
Keep us updated on your progress, and if you come across any more history behind it.
I pulled it out of the field and got it sitting on gravel and pulled the rear wheels and discovered that the wheels are rusted away. I was luck and found two wheels with tires that hold air. Mismatch pair but it's a start. IT ROLL'S
Getting the trailer ready to go get it.
When I get the magneto and carburetor back on Ill get a video of its first start in 22 years. I also cleaned the inside the fuel tank and will use red coat tank liner in the tank. I hate fighting a dirty tank. Always having to stop and clear a clog.
It had light rust inside.
I'm going to pull the valve cover and make sure there aren't any stuck valves or bent push rods. The engine wasn't stuck but often condensation in the valve cover causes stuck valves.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I pulled it out of the field and got it sitting on gravel and pulled the rear wheels and discovered that the wheels are rusted away. I was luck and found two wheels with tires that hold air. Mismatch pair but it's a start. IT ROLL'S
Getting the trailer ready to go get it.
When I get the magneto and carburetor back on Ill get a video of its first start in 22 years. I also cleaned the inside the fuel tank and will use red coat tank liner in the tank. I hate fighting a dirty tank. Always having to stop and clear a clog.
It had light rust inside.
I'm going to pull the valve cover and make sure there aren't any stuck valves or bent push rods. The engine wasn't stuck but often condensation in the valve cover causes stuck valves.
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A photo through the fuel tank filler hole. I fires cleaned it with a pint of sawn dish soap and a gallon of water to break down the petroleum film , then rinsed and put a gallon of evaporust and rotated it to different positions for a couple days. Its clean. It almost appears to have some type of coating in there.
The paint on this tractor sort of shows that it had a previous restoration. Maybe 25 or 30 years ago.
I took the donor steering gearbox apart and ordered new seals. It looks good but was dry of liquid oil. Turned to tar.
I googled the part numbers on the gearbox. It was used in the Stutz Bearcat and a 1950 Chrystler New Yorker. Big cars
It's brand name is Gemmer
 

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Discussion Starter #10
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Here is the inside of the same fuel tank after putting in the liner. Its a 15 gallon WC unstyled fuel tank.
I poured in a quart and rotated the tank to coat top, bottom and ends then drained all excess that pooled in the bottom. I ended up draining a third of a quarte back out. So it took 2/3 of a quarte to coat the tank.
This tank only had light rust so this is all that I'm doing. If it had pin holes in the tank I would do another coat.
This stuff works good in light coats. If you leave puddles it will dry with a skin on top and not dry underneath and you will have a real mess. I have only read about leaving it too thick.
It works if used right. Its time consuming draining excess and getting the whole inside coated.
I use the red stuff but suspect other brands all work.
The writing on the photo was explaining something to my son.
 

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The tank doesn't look bad for sitting so long. It does look like it's been coated before.
The serial plate looks like it's been repainted maybe twice??
The tank inside looks nice I don't think you'll have any problem from it.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Those tanks were heavy. I learned my lesson on trying to get by with dirty tanks but this tank cleaned up well enough that I could have got by without coating but , looking at the long run the rust would have returned. We have high humidity here in mid eastern Missouri. Tanks condensate bad

Dave
good catch on the yellow paint.
I found some of that yellow paint from a previous paint job on the edge of the valve cover and seen that on the tag. It had a yellow paint job at one time.
I'm putting a winch on the trailer I wanted to get it running and drive it up on the trailer but parts for the steering box parts are slow in shipment. Its time to get it home.

I rebuilt carb and magneto and adding new spark plugs.
Its nice to have a machine that only has spark and fuel to run. No starter or generator on this one. Hand crank only. There's no place on the bellhousing for a starter.
If the spark and fuel is right most of these tractors start on first or second compression stroke. My IH Super c does.
If I'm hand cranking it and it dont hit I'll look and see why. I'm too old to crank engines for very long
Its never the tractors fault when the dont start. I want to leave this tractor as it is with exception of paint a new cutting edge for the blade and tires.
I wouldn't mind having a freeze plug heater for cold winter mornings.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
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I had plans to go get the tractor Saturday morning and it was raining. So I went out in the rain and loaded it.
I should be trying to start it within a week, maybe less. It was only a 25 mile trip.
 

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Glad to see you got it home. (y) You got lucky finding it in such a short drive.
 

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I't is good to get it home. The drain plug in the block was a regular plug with rounded off flats so I found a plug too use until I got a new petcock. I took the plug out and nice green antifreeze gushed out. That was a concern not knowing if water had been in the block.
I had to heat the two screws that held the front hood strap. I removed the valve cover to take a look. I was happy to see a clean valve train. It had a film on the bottom of the valve cover but didnt have that stink of a worn out engine. Ill check the pusk rod clearance when I get it started and replace the valve cover gasket.
Here is a photo of the only numbers That I found on the engine. There are no numbers stamped on the side of the block behind the carburetor like the book shows. If anyone knows of another location for stamped ID numbers on the engine please let me know.
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What are these numbers stamped next to the seat spring on the differential. 4x-6050
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A look at the valve trane
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Here is a photo of the broken exhaust manifold. I have repaired quite a few broken manifolds over the years. Its my understanding this style manifold is hard to find. Where the two cracks radiate outward I will drill a small hole at the end of the crack before brazing them. That stops the crack from progressing.
I'll find some pipe to cut and grind into the missing piece.
Cast iron and brazing work well together. I had an early Massy Harris 44 that had very dirty cast iron the manifold that was in three pieces and was challenging to repair.
Ill get a before and after photo of the repair.
I hope I dont end up eating my words.
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I'm starting to feel like this tractor will run and work again without major overhaul. I havn't looked at the differential yet but dont hear any noise. I poured some marvel mystery oil in the cylinders to loosen any stuck rings. It turns over fine. The fuel tank is cleaned and lined. The carburetor is rebuilt. I still need to assemble the magneto with the new coil ,points and plugs.
Fuel and fire should meet at the spark plugs for a big bang soon.
Progressing slowly
I need some fuel for the cutting torch to remove the badly rusted cutting edge on the blade
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The seat on my WC grader tractor does not have the piece of spring steel that bends around to bolt a seat backrest on.
I bought the part on ebay that is the spring steel with the backrest missing.
My question is
One end has three holes in the end. The other end has a slot about three inches long.
Which end bolts to the bottom of the seat ? Thank's Mike

I'm sure one way aligns the backrest better. Its hard to tell holding the piece of steel up there.

I'm afraid I'll slide off the back while grabbing for those hand operated brakes. Getting up in years.
 

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Not sure which end has holes and which is slotted.... but....
The end that's straight, from the bend to the end, goes under the seat.
The end that has a "kick" is for the seatback to mount. Does that help?
Best I remember it's the slot under the seat and the holes adjust the seat back height.
 

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Yes that helps. It lets the seat be slid back or forward to the operators comfort. Somewhat ! I have an old steel chair that has a very similar seat back that I can use..
I'll just feel more comfortable with something behind my back. Most tractors the seat isn't sitting in mid air off the rear end.o_O Although I guess some of the early tractors did
I hope to get the magneto on and get it running this week

Thanks for the help.
 
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