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Discussion Starter #1
I am posting this in the hopes of finding out more about this very interesting old binder that is sitting on the edge of one of the fields on my family's property. I do know a few general things about it. It was manufactured somewhere between 1918 and 1928 (the years E.B. Osborne was in operation). I have been unable to discover much in regard to more specific information however, and while I have come across several old newspaper advertisements and sketches, I have not found any really good photographs. My hope is that someone out there knows more about the history of this machine and perhaps has some good pictures, either old ones or of a binder that has been restored. I am really excited to learn more about this old binder. I am including several photos I've taken of it.
 

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I haven't got a clue as to what it is. Welcome to ATF. In the meantime feel free to drop in on the new members section and tell us alittle about yourself.
 

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Hi Red Kiwi,
Yes, that is the machine we seem to have on our property. I have come across that sketch and other similar ones. I'm really hoping someone can tell me more about the binder itself, or maybe even actual photographs of one. Thank you for taking the time to read my post and find the sketch. I really appreciate it. :)
 

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I looked through my manuals and found this info plus a couple of photos.
"Osborne grain binders were featured for several years after Harvester's acquisition of this company.The 8ft. New Osborne binder featured an outside reel support. The tongue trucks or forecarriage was an extra cost item. A rod running diagonally from the binder tongue to the upper part of the binder frame adjusted the cutting height through a control lever. Another lever controlled reel height.
The 1917 Osborne binder was available in 5.6.7.& 8 foot sizes. International Harvester emphasized the unique guard fingers used on this model. They were designed to get under downed grain, a perennial problem for harvesting machinery. The forecarriage was extra equipment,available at an additional cost. An outer reel support on this machine was a great improvement."
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you again for doing more research Red Kiwi, it's much appreciated. :) Those are interesting facts. Do you perhaps have any information in your manuals regarding the Osborne binders that were made after Emerson Brantingham (E.B.) purchased the Osborne line from International Harvester? The binder my family has was made by the E.B. Osborne company, which was formed in 1918 when Osborne was purchased by the Emerson Brantingham company of Rockford, Illinois.
 

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Sorry, I've no more info on the binders.
 
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