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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello; i have 8 fairly large; huge for this area Arba vitaes. Without taking a scientific measurement am guessing the range of around 25 feet tall. Give or take on the measurement. The symptoms an oily drip or bleed from the needles. Most of the time in this area that would say to me aphids. Do You guys know of any other conditions that would cause this???? What will be the best spray to combat this problem????
 

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Look to make sure aphids are on the plant Melvin. I am not familiar with that one. If you can get it, use Acephate, the generic name. Orthene is the trade name, and we used it on tobacco for aphids and other varmints. If the infestation is really bad, you may have to spray more than once. Don't send 'em up here :!: :eek: :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not 100 per cent sure yet; nominally aphids here are little tiney varmints that burrow into the leaves dedacious trees or crops or needles of evergreens causing an oily residue to drip all over everything. As yet i havent been able to find another varmint to accuse as the culprit; but once again its not conclusive. I will check with my suppliers and see if this product is availible. And i sure wont send them Your way; ya'll got nuff aggrivations on Your hands. Hmmm this leaves me with an idea on sending them mebbe to the middle of the Gulf of Mexico :D :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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try spraying a mixture of white sugar and water most bugs cannot digest sugar makes them sick and die but you still need to kill the larva admire insectice works on aphids i dont now if same name stateside it travels into the leaves and kills as they eat
 

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Admire would do it, but from what I know about it, to me it would be cost prohibitive. Melvin, I think that Acephate, the generic, or Orthene is known as an organophosphate. Not sure about the spelling, but that's how I'd write based upon how it sounds.
The secretion from the aphids you mention Melvin is called "honeydew" by university entomologists here.

Some Brief info about Orthene



Home » Canada Agriculture » Products » ORTHENE » Overview
For contact and systemic control of key insect pests in registered vegetable crops, tobacco and ornamental plants.
When it comes to controlling key insect pests in many high-value vegetables, ornamentals and tobacco, trust in the powerful one-two punch of ORTHENE® 75 SP Insecticide.

ORTHENE controls a wide variety of damaging insects, but is best known for the excellent activity on aphids and Lepidoptera larvae. Once applied, ORTHENE works in two ways, providing effective contact control of foliar-feeding insects and rapidly absorbing into plant tissue, controlling insects as they feed for two to three weeks after application. Acephate, the active ingredient in ORTHENE, rapidly penetrates plant tissue. Once dried, it is less susceptible to wash off during rainfall or irrigation.

VEGETABLES
ORTHENE Insecticide can be used as a foliar spray to protect labeled vegetable crops from European corn borer, tarnished plant bug, potato flea beetle, green peach aphid and other damaging pests. Plus, it can be applied to young tomato plants in transplant water to provide systemic protection during those critical first weeks of crop development.

ORNAMENTALS
When used as a foliar spray, ORTHENE provides both contact and systemic control of key pests, including aphids, armyworm, greenhouse whitefly, leafminer, leafroller, mealybug and flower thrips.

TOBACCO
ORTHENE can be applied as a foliar spray to control tomato hornworm, flea beetle and green peach aphid. In addition, it can be added to transplant water to control darksided cutworm, potato flea beetle, root maggot, green peach aphid and thrips for two to three weeks after transplanting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank You; until i can find another culprit i'm still leaning toward aphids as that seems to wind up being the culprit on most of the broad leaf plants here. Am unsure as these are needles with the same symptoms; and basically i am working in an area with relatively little experience.
 
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