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I had a near miss a few weeks ago that shed light on to a very forgotten rule of the rode. On the day that this "Near Miss" happened I was making a run to the house which is about six miles from the hay field my family and I were working in to get a part for our square baler. Got to the house got the part and was on the way back when it happened. Down the road on the other side of the hay field was a building project that had a convoy of dump trucks running on the dirt road that led from the field to near our house. Well the past 2 weeks had been dry and the roads were creating little dust storms when a vehicle traveled by. So I am running back to the hay field in the family's f-250 with about 100 gallons of diesel in a tank in back "This effected the handling badly and just as I rounded a corner I met on of the dump trucks. No problem I was on my side we just pasted each other and went on about the day. The road the dump truck had just passed over was the worse stretch for dust in the hole trip to the hay field. As I passed the truck I ended up in a dust storm so I slowed down and this is when I made a mistake. I took my eyes off the dust storm to look down and turn on the running lights, When I looked back up visability in the dust was about 15 feet and 15 feet ahead was ten kids on bicycles riding the hole width of the road. I was just as startled as they were, I hit the brakes and the tank of fuel just about busted it mounts. I got it stopped before a collision but this got me thinking.

I drive our big tractor a Cockshutt 1750 and mower to the hay fields about 6 miles away. This is done all on back roads. When I meet some one traveling the other way I will pull the tractor just as far into the ditch as I can go since the mower takes up lots of room. Most of the people are friendly and wave, Two many times to count I have meet people on the there cell phone or doing something or they are just plain selfish and practically force me off the road :evil: because I am in a narrow stretch of road and They don't want to slow down a minute for me to pull over.

We read all over the news about this wreck and that wreck and wonder why more are happening. I think it is because most are selfish and want to get where they are going fast and don't bother to be a defensive driver. Leave a reply and tell me why you think there are so many wrecks, Or share you experiences with crazy people on the road.

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-Willy-
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Words of the wise. If you never hauled anything liquid, go half the speed you think is safe. Liquid when it sloshes will push you. Come to a stop too quickly and you will see. There was a fireman that lost his life here in Maine. He went around a corner as he had done many a time before. He died on that corner. What was different? The water tanker he drove was not fully filled. He had a half tank and was doing 30 mph around that turn. The thousand gallons of water pushed the truck off of the road. The tanker an ex fuel hauler, flipped over and they say he became a stain in the field.

Please slow down with any liquid.

The only load that is worse is hauling cattle in a tractor trailer. You pass a pond and the whole trailer will shift at that pond.
 

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The cause of most accidents, besides alcohol, is that most drivers don't care about other drivers. They act as if they are the only one on the road.
Another thing is the new cars that do too much of the driving that the driver doesn't have to pay as much attention as we used to. Try taking your eyes off the road in a forty-eight Ford for example. Really it's easy to forget you are driving with the soft suspension, power steering, air conditioning, etc. Heck now they have cars that beep when you drift out of your lane and put on the brakes for you.
 

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I could go on all day...for me it's job security. About the fireman though - we have a rule that you drive with the tank full or empty. If we go use 500 gallons of water out of our tanker, the other 1500 gets dumped in the ditch. It is simply too dangerous to risk it over water.
 

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The above post was a learning post for me , I never knew that about water in a tank .
I think a lot of wrecks now are caused by people being on cell phones.
 

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Accident statistics show that accidents resulting from people talking on cell phones are now exceeding accidents caused by drunk drivers.
 

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Lots of things cause accidents, from what others have said, to people not taking onto consideration weather conditions. Or as in your situation dust, or smoke.
If the construction site is creating that much dust, as to block vision on a roadway, it needs to be brought to the attention of the local authorities.
Most states have laws that require contractors to use water to keep dust to a minimum in the vicinity of a roadway. Though not always enforced. :roll:

Your story reminds me of an incident that happened years ago. One late summer / early fall morning I headed off to work as usual, just before 6:00 a.m.
Not quite daylight, and with a fog so thick you couldn't see more than a few feet. Without the fog you would have just barely seen daylight on the horizon.
If anyone else has ever been in a whiteout, this fog was close. With the headlights just reflecting back from the fog, I could just make out pavement in front of me.
The mailboxes seemed to jump out of nowhere as I drove along, as if hovering in mid air, with the feel of the tires on the edge of the road guiding me along.
Even driving well under the speed limit, I was less than ten feet of the stop sign, a mile down the road, before it came into view. Thought about turning around then, but didn't want to be late for work. :roll:
Also knowing that the fog usually eased up a bit if not completely after I got away from the creek that my road follows. As it did this time, but not much.
When I turned on the next road and continued away from the creek valley, the fog eased enough to be able to see the edge of the road, and a faint reflection of the center lines, just at the front of the truck.
Now I'm about a two miles from home, and it happens. Still driving not more than 35m.p.h., I see a faint red glow in front of me. By the time I have to think about it, I"m on it!!
An Amish buggy, with a very dim back lamp. :shock: Brakes!!! No time!! Swerve!! Missed the buggy, :D Edge of the road, :eek: back over , got stopped off the side of the road, checked my drawers. :?
Zeke and Ellie on their way to town, had a Dr's appointment and picking up supplies. Had to get an early start. Being as ealy in the morning, I was the first other person they had seen on the roads.
After I explained to them that if they were going to be out on mornings with fog like this, they needed a brighter back light, and if I wasn't paying good attention they would now be meat pizzas.
I got behind them with my flashers on and followed them the remaining five miles into town where the fog wasn't as heavy and the street lights made it safer for them to be on the road.
Was still late for work, but the boss paid me anyway, after I told him why. ;)
 

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My Dad used to haul cattle/hogs to market from N/W Ohio to Cleveland stock yards for a trucker neighbor several time a month back in the 1950's before the turnpike was completed. He said many-a-time that with the rural roads having a crown in the middle & bridges being more flat, that the cattle would shift all over the trailer & worst was stopping as cattle would all move toward the front & then back as he started up again.
Tying gates between a few cattle helped somewhat to keep them from shifting around, but cut down on the number of stock that could be hauled at a time.
Most of those trips started with loading the stock around midnight so they were arriving @ yards by daybreak so most of the loaded driving was in the dark with a 1947 Ford farm truck.
He was paid a dollar a head to make the average round trip which was over 8 hours. 45 MPH was about all that 6 cylinder could go & that was a fair safe speed to drive anyways. I rode with him a few times.
Bob
 

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Speaking of tankers. I watched a car stop for a yellow light in front of a milk truck. A milk truck has no baffles, and he had bout a half load I guess. He stopped completely, backed a couple of feet, and punted the car half way cross the street.
 

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Having been a CDL instructor as well as a State of VA examiner after leaving police work I can say that over 50% of accidents are preventable if we would all practice defensive driving. The old saying that you can be dead right has a real significance,Just slowing down not pressing the speed limits taking a breath before moving on red or a stop sign etc.Most of us are too preoccupied by so many things that we really don't concentrate on our driving but more on where we are headed or what comes next. Anticapation of what the guy ahead or behind or pulling out might do. I dare say none of us really leaves enough stopping dist when in heavy traffic and I dare say we have all been guilty of that momentary lapse of judgement and have been the offender at times. Just a thought.



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Mike, I have to agree with you. If people paid more attention to what they are doing, "driving," and less to things around them, cell-phones, radios, etc there would be fewer accidents.
 

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It counts for anything in a motor vehicle accident. Maine has a zero tollerance for driving impaired. It could be hands free, or a sandwich. If your distracted and they find a burger king meal splashed about the interior, gotcha!

Maine is also driving slow unmarked minivans with two state troopers on board. They drive at 48 mph in a 55 zone. They pull over to let everyone pass. They have a camera with the trooper in the back seat. He is taking video of anyone breaking the law when they pass. Wether it be some one on a hands free, or some one drinking a slurpee. If your holding onto that slurpee instead of the wheel, your distracted. They do watch for 5 seconds, because you are allowed to sip it and put it down, just not to nurse it. If your talking into a headset, even with both hands on the wheel, your brain is not on the road. They radio ahead to awaiting cruisers whom are all too happy with giving you a $500 ticket. It does not matter whether you are a truck driver to driving an antique auto, your distracted and you will get busted.

Maine is tired of having to clean up accidents because some one thought it was ok to use hands free device that takes 75% of your concentration.
 

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Farmall fan said:
I had a near miss a few weeks ago that shed light on to a very forgotten rule of the rode. On the day that this "Near Miss" happened I was making a run to the house which is about six miles from the hay field my family and I were working in to get a part for our square baler. Got to the house got the part and was on the way back when it happened. Down the road on the other side of the hay field was a building project that had a convoy of dump trucks running on the dirt road that led from the field to near our house. Well the past 2 weeks had been dry and the roads were creating little dust storms when a vehicle traveled by. So I am running back to the hay field in the family's f-250 with about 100 gallons of diesel in a tank in back "This effected the handling badly and just as I rounded a corner I met on of the dump trucks. No problem I was on my side we just pasted each other and went on about the day. The road the dump truck had just passed over was the worse stretch for dust in the hole trip to the hay field. As I passed the truck I ended up in a dust storm so I slowed down and this is when I made a mistake. I took my eyes off the dust storm to look down and turn on the running led lights, When I looked back up visability in the dust was about 15 feet and 15 feet ahead was ten kids on bicycles riding the hole width of the road. I was just as startled as they were, I hit the brakes and the tank of fuel just about busted it mounts. I got it stopped before a collision but this got me thinking.

I drive our big tractor a Cockshutt 1750 and mower to the hay fields about 6 miles away. This is done all on back roads. When I meet some one traveling the other way I will pull the tractor just as far into the ditch as I can go since the mower takes up lots of room. Most of the people are friendly and wave, Two many times to count I have meet people on the there cell phone or doing something or they are just plain selfish and practically force me off the road :evil: because I am in a narrow stretch of road and They don't want to slow down a minute for me to pull over.


We read all over the news about this wreck and that wreck and wonder why more are happening. I think it is because most are selfish and want to get where they are going fast and don't bother to be a defensive driver. Leave a reply and tell me why you think there are so many wrecks, Or share you experiences with crazy people on the road.

Farmall Fan
You are absolutely right.. Defensive driver are not treated properly.. Most drivers want to drive fast and push slow drivers.. This is not good at all
 
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