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Discussion Starter #1
Is this trans as bad as the Ford select a junks were?
Looking for a more modern tractor with power steering and a good 3 PT hitch set up. this one is a 730 with the case o matic.




:D Al
 

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I personally don't know that much about them, just what I have read on other websites... I've not come across anything purely negative about them - other than they do not have a "brake clutch" which seems to be a big deal for some, not so much for others. Overall they sound like they were a pretty good transmission though? Hopefully somebody with some personal experience will chime in.. I hope I've helped some.
 

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Case-O-Matics are good units. It's an automatic transmission style torque converter in front of the transmission. You start off in converter drive, then once you're moving you can shift into direct drive. The most important thing to remember when starting off is to have the engine idling, or else you might pop a wheely.
 

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A CASE-O-MATIC is only as good as the operator. At first they were absolute failures because nobody including the dealers really knew how to use them. Guys would burn up the convertors and pumps from abuse and not maintain the oil and filter. I would buy it if it runs and drives in direct and COM ranges. I would then go buy the appropriate owners manual for it and sit down and read it cover to cover before I used it. They are a very advanced tractor for their day. They are nice for planting cultivating and hay work. My late uncle bought 2 830D COM CK's brand new, one 65 and one 66. Used them both very hard, both had some engine work done for more power, and I know one of them is still going strong today, the other one maybe too but I lost track of it. Pulled 5 bottom plows with them. The COM gives some slip so the engine won't bog down as the load increases. The transmission is the same unit from 400-830, a 2 range 4 speed. The only difference is the COM convertor took the place of the disc type clutch. The Ford selcto-speeds were actually built like an automatic car transmission where you have several clutch packs that "change" gears. They are very costly to fix and a pain in the butt to adjust. My neighbor has an old style 4000 SOS.
 

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I've not come across anything purely negative about them - other than they do not have a "brake clutch" which seems to be a big deal for some, not so much for others.

Does this mean that they would crunch into gear if your not used to them :?:
 

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I've heard people who have no idea how to drive them wrecking the system in a few months, then you see them for sale with the note of "works good in direct drive" because they roasted the convertor. You have to idle the engine to shift so the trans stops moving. I forget where the convertor stalls on these.
 

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Is there a clutch as well as the torque converter, or does the latter just replace the clutch all together. My cousins lad is in Canada at the moment and has been looking at an 830 Caseamatic,
this is why I am trying to get some information for him. It would be a long way to bring a tractor if it was no good. Once moving can you change on the move just the same as with a clutch? and finally if something does go wrong, can they be fixed ? Thanks in advance.
 

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They have a 6 disk clutch inside the housing, but it is something that is rarely serviced unless a COM overhaul is needed. 3 friction and 3 steel plate wet clutch. Attached is a page from a parts book for an 830. There are some parts available for them. I can't remember if CASE made the convertor or they bought them. If there are problems inside any shop that is reputable with heavy equipment should be able to aid in repairs as a lot of dozers and wheel loaders from the 60's 70's and 80's used similar designs. In all my years using my uncles if a gear change was needed I would stop, slow the engine down, shift, and go about my work. We didn't use direct range much. There is a lever as seen on the one in the photo above that is pointing down on the steering column, that is your direct/COM lever. That actuates the 6 plate clutch. Basically locks the convertor so there is zero slip. There is a foot pedal on the left side where the clutch would be that moves the hydraulic valve on the side of the COM housing, kind of similar to a foot controlled mower except you cannot reverse from this pedal. Where guys get into trouble is on the maintenance end of it too. They need regular fluid changes just like an automatic in a car or truck. They have a charge pump that is a lot of $$$ to rebuild if it was starved and overheated. They did put on pressure and temperature gauges too so you could monitor the system. Some 800's didn't have them.

 

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i've now owned my 730 case-O-matic for 2 years and love it. Only problems is the oil filter to change isn't the funnest job in the world and to get into gear must idle engine right down or will grind. but working wise pulling a 14 foot cultivatorswitching between high and low is smooth and somehow always just the perfect speed you want. Baling same story. i hope to buy a second one some day.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
From what I have read here they were not much better than a slect o junk Ford.

Don't be so lazy and use the clutch and shift at any rpm.

:D Al
 
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