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Discussion Starter #1
In your working life time how many times have you change the type of work you do

I farm till I was 30
had my own service station garage for 18 years
did maintance for fertilizer company 5 years
then did maintance for apartment complex till I retired
now work as a greeter for 4 years
so I really changed jobs 4 times in my work life.. ;)
 

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I farmed from the time I was 12 and left home in 1968 to 1991 when I had a really bad polio relapse. It was the second one and the Drs. said I would never work again. I didn't work for 1 year. My health improved so I went to work for some friends at a small feed store for 6 months. It sold. I got a job at a small ranch, haying and taking care of a small beef herd. Real reason I took the job was because I could fish when I wanted to in the big lake full of blue gill and trophy size largemouth bass. Friends came to me that winter, wanting me to go work for the City in the water department. I worked there for 16 years until my health was failing again. Worked 1/2 time for 6 months. Seperation date was January 13th 2011, used sick time until my birthday March 27th, official early retirement date was July 1st 2011. I took this job working 16 hours a week as Public Works Director April 16th 2011 with the understanding that I can take 2 week vacations whenever I want to get away to the cabin at Joseph....James

1968-1991 Farmed.
1991-1992 off for health reasons
1992 Feed store for 6 months
1992-1994 Cattle ranch for 2 years
1994-2011 16 years for City of Dallas
2011-2012 1 year so far for City of Falls City
 

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When I left school I was shearing sheep,when sheep were wet and in the off season worked for my father on the farm
then got my own farm 600 acres sheep,beef cattle,and wheat or barley but had to sell as health packed up,worked for the
ministry of works on a new irrigation scheme till health packed up,was in hospital of and on for a year,took up restoring old
cars just worked when I was feeling good enough did five over 10 years searching for parts took up a lot of time,retired to
Christchurch and was real busy helping a niebour restore an Allis RC he was always restoring or building new machinery,he
retired and was dead within two years,so I restored a Triumph Herald and then at the age of 70 bought a Ferguson 35 and
restored it it in a year,started work 1953 and I was a guide at the Royal New Zealand Air Force for 11 years after I came to
Christchurch and I am still going perhaps not on all cylinders but still enjoying life.
 

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I worked on the family farm from as far back as I can remember up until I was 17 or 18. Dad retired from farming, except for the garden, and gave me everything, I was 16 then. I had close to 1000 acres of hay that me and one hired hand cut, baled, and delivered to customers. I lost customers to others, and several passed away, so I stopped farming and took a job at a small family business making antifreeze additives. Due to the company trying to keep up with the market place, by the time I had been there 6 years, we were a 100% packaging supply company. (Starnge chnage of venue!) I was there for almost 20 years. We closed due to the hurricanes of 2004 hitting our major supplier in Alabama, and out biggest customer in Asheville, SC and we were forced to close. I began my newest job in 2005, Im a warehouse manager for a major plastics manufacturer, so next time you go to the hospital, (Not meant in a bad way) look at your IV bag, it could very well have been in my warehouse!! Also, Butterball turkey, Holley Farms, and several others, I stock the films for that, and Jack Links beef jerkey, Oh I could go on and on!!!!
 

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All I ever wanted to do was farm with my Dad and I did so for many years. Now its just me still farming the same land that my Dad and his Dad before him farmed. So no job changes here in over 40 years. I guess it will end one of these days but I will have no regrets.
 

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Started out working in the warehouse at a local sewing factory. I was there almost a year. The only good thing that I can say about that place is that's where I met my wife! I got tired of the 90-100 hour weeks so I left.

Started going through temp services to different manufacturing facilities around the area. I did that for a few years.

I then got on at another plant called Sumitomo in Morgantown, KY. I really think that that was the place that I would have retired from if NAFTA hadn't been a factor. Great people to work with, great company to work for, and awesome benefits... I was happy until they moved it all to Mexico. :(

I then went to school for Business Office Management which later helped me get the job at a meter reading company. I became the project supervisor after a few months and kept that job for over 4 years. The meters that me and my crew were reading were being changed over to wireless reads and my crew was slowly being reduced. I knew that I needed something before too long so I changed yet again.

A family member hired me in his department to work on coffee equipment and commercial dishwashers. We did some chemical sales and other stuff related to the food industry. I worked for him for almost 2 years before I reallized that it is really hard working for family (especially him) and that I was just not happy with the way my life was going.

I left there and got my CDL. I'd been around big trucks all my life and always had the urge to drive. I discussed it with my wife and we were in agreement that that's the direction I should go. After some struggles, I am now driving a truck all over the state and enjoying it.

I've lost count so you all will have to add those up for me. :) ;)
 

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One job never changed. I worked Dad's, and Granddad's (now my) farm evenings, weekend's and days off, all my life. As Dad and Granddad did.
I can't see that ever changing. It's more a way of life. If you count doing short order cooking, for pocket money, while going to college, then twice.
Right after school I went to work for an industrial electrical/electronic maintenance company. Their main contracts were the three big oil terminals in Louisville.
Did everything from changing light bulbs, pump control, yard lighting, to the oil blend and package equipment, maintenance and troubleshooting.
Found out what it felt like to get hit by 480v there, one foggy morning in a bucket truck, working on river dock lighting. That'll wake ya up! :shock:
Working on the blend unit controls and equipment, I found I had a good knack for troubleshooting electro/mechanical equipment, and really enjoyed it.
I was with them for four years. My last job with them, brought to my chosen career.

I was doing a job at a county jail where they were upgrading and installing electric locks and a control room. There was also an elevator that was to be
controlled from the control room. My company was supplying the control room equipment and wiring to the devices. There was a problem with the elevator
interface, that I found to be noise from their power supply. Pulled in a shielded pair and problem solved. Owner of the company said he liked my work and
troubleshooting skill, and would I go to work for him. I asked "Doin' what ?" He took me to the elevator control room, and hoistway showed me around and
explained what my job would be.
First ya gotta know something about me. Since I can remember, when I was a kid, I would take apart and put back together, and make work, any and all battery powered or mechanical toys I ever had.
The old metal ones were easier, when they started using plastic is when I found out heat can be your friend. When you had to gently spread the plastic arms to get a gear out, then in.

So when the guy showed me the elevator controller with rows of relays, contactors, timers, wires running everywhere, hoistmotor, generator, the hoistway equipment, and said you'll be troubleshooting, and repairing these.
I thought, "this could be FUN :D You're gonna pay me almost double to troubleshoot and take apart and fix big toys?" Didn't take me long to decide to take the job.
I couldn't have ever made a better decision in my life. It was the perfect career for me. I've never got paid for working a day in my life. I'm like a big kid playing with big toys.
Finding out what is wrong with a machine, and making it work. The ones that make me think the hardest are the most satisfying. Still today, no matter what piece of equipment I'm working on. ;)
 

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I started working on the farm, and when Daddy went to work in town I helped the neighbor farm, so I could drive tractors. When Daddy opened his own feed store I worked there till I went into the Navy. I started in the Navy as a shipfitter, then a boilerman. I reenlisted to go to electronics technician school, which I easily passed. While on shore duty I worked (moon-lighting) in various gas stations and Tasca Ford as a mechanic. Then the Navy changed me to an Electronics Warfare technician. When I retired I bought an ole Ford WT-9000 tractor and went trucking till I went broke. After that I went to work in the City of Portsmouth radio shop for twenty-one years. I went back to truck driving (somebody elses truck). I drove dumps, low boys, and bout anything else. The last company teed me off so I quit and took my social security.
The best part of the Navy was every two years or so you got a transfer. A new duty station was just like getting a new job. Never a dull moment.
 

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from 5 to 18 worked on the ky dairy/tobacco farm
18-21 worked for uncle sam as a airborne infantry soldier, (missed the farm)
22-23 back on the dairy farm full time, part time driving the milk truck on my off weekends, headbutting with dad led to me going full time truck driver, ( Idid not miss the cows)
23-51, full time trucker, part time farmer

52-current, spend more time on farm, but still drive about 15-20 hrs a week on most weeks
 

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I worked on grandparents and neighbors farms until 16 then worked publicly during summer and holiday vacations from school through college. After college, I went directly to work for a textile company in Shelby, NC to be head of a quality control lab. After 3 days, I accompanied the plant manager to another mill in the company to see new running equipment that was to be installed in a new addition planned for the mill where I was working. After the visit, his words were "come back here for awhile and learn about these machines". After a few months, I worked with the overhauling crew, and a little over a year after joining the company and the new addition was completed, I was assigned a second shift supervisor position in the new addition with the modern machinery :( .

My crew folks called me at home ifn they were gonna be absent from work. I had to struggle to find help. If not, often my fixer, a mechanic, would have to run a production job if I was short of help, and I was the fixer.

All of this resulted in many 12 hour days with not many free week-ends. It grew old quickly. My Granny from this place had passed away while I was in college, and Grandpa moved on while we were in Shelby. I was ready to come home, had done some job hunting up here, but the economy of the mid to late 70s was much like todays.

Mrs. Jim, with a science education degree, could not get a job teaching in Shelby 'cuz, according the superintendent of education, "we don't want our kids to be influenced by outsiders".

One of my brothers and I bought the farm from Dad and the heirs. We began moving stuff up here on week-ends when I could get away. I had a full-sized Ford F-150 van so we could haul rite much. On week-ends I also plowed and prepared ground for tobacco. My dad helped me repair the plumbing in the homeplace so we could move in. We stayed with my parents for a few weeks.

I moved here in early May 1978, and Mrs, Jim stayed in Shelby for about another month to finish up with a part-time job she finally had gotten in an elementary school. Mrs. Jim got a half-time teaching job in the fall, and finally got a full-time teaching job in 1979 at a newly built high school.

Mrs Jim taught for 30+ years and is now retired. I farmed tobacco until the buyout in 2004. We did many things in the same ways as my grandaddys and the farmers I helped in my youth. We hired help to harvest the tobacco, but otherwise did all the work ourselves. We have remodeled the home as we could over time. I also began working in the fall and Christmas season at the same place as when I was in school. I did that for almost 20 years until the place closed.

We began producing and selling farmers market veggies about 10 years ago.

So what have I done lately? Mom passed away last October after about 6 years in assisted living and nursing home facilities. Her estate is getting closer each day to being settled. Mrs. Jim and I are buying my brothers' shares of her home and farm for our daughter and us. We are working to get it in shape for her family to move in. I have also been rebuilding and repairing the pasture fence there so I can move daughter's horse and a few cows to it.

We are also hopefully beginning a serious effort to settle damages from our auto accident in October of 2008. It was a life-changing event, and even though it may seem from the above history that we are ok, we suffer pain and discomfort each day. We are thankful to have the pain, which means we survived what could have been life-ending. We have had lots of help through this from neighbors. We try really hard to count our blessings each day, yet sometimes it is difficult.

We also continue to protest and object at every opportunity to local governments that want to put a 6 lane road through our property and continue to use strategies to run farmers off their land here. That will no doubt be our hardest job of all.
 

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They didn't seem to be listening very well tonight Dave. :roll:
 

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first job was pumping gas when i was twelve in summer and weekends next year worked weekends in winter at ski hill for 5 years and summer and fall for farmer then went to general motors just prior to 18 th birthday worked 31 years and retired from gm 7 years ago have farmed last 25 years doing farmers markets while taking leave of absence 10 weeks a year in summer while in gm first 6 years i worked in gm i did mechanical repairs and body work on side never was much for sports really wasnt my intrest . :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
bikerdave said:
You know I feel sorry for a person that can only do one thing to make a living. :( :shock: :?
you and me both I can do a little of all remember that old saying "Jack of all trades master of none" ;)
 

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I'm a "jack of all trades" and master of most! If it's gonna cost me money and I need it done, that's what I do. I hate paying labor, not that it's not earned. Oh I believe that someone doing work for me should get paid and paid well, cause either I'm too lazy or can't do the job. :lol:
 

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While most of my time has been with cattle and farming, i have done a few other things to make a buck. For a number of years i repaired Allis cotton strippers and cotton handling equipment, I got out of that buisness just before last fall; good thing too as there was no cotton due to drought. Fer years i jumped in as a millwright overhauling roller mills and hammer mills as well as all other stationary equipment at cattle feeder operations. Also have done time in the oil patch, pumping roughnecking and high pressure control. Last but not least have spent conciderable time on the off road hauling heavy behind the wheel running Mack trucks. Might say its all been down dirt road.
 

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Lets see
1. Car mechanic while in high school for my senior year
2. Handy Andy home inprovement for 4 years, selling kitchens
3. Home Depot for 2 years stocking shelves
4. Jack Mcormack Enterprises for 4 years on a phone tech line for Mopar Performance, chrysler race car and parts
5. Police officer for the last 13 years
So 5 times so far...at least for the next 12 years until I can retire.....then I'll be a jack of all trades but mostly a hobby farmer ;) :D I cant wait
 
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