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Hi ! New to the forum. And to tractors. Don’t know a darn thing about em, but I want one. I would like to restore an older tractor. 40s ,50s model? Was hoping to use it around the house when done. Brush hog and mower deck. Maybe some veteran members can tell me what i am looking for? What’s a good model to bring back to life? Any to stay away from? American made and around $2k(for tractor)
 

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Welcome to the forum. I haven't been hanging around too much lately myself, but you're in good hands here. I don't want to tell you I'm a veteran tractor owner, but I'll tell you what I like. Farmall Cubs are easy to work on and learn. The information is out there. Parts are pretty easy to get. There are mower decks out there for them. I'm not sure about brush hogging. Another one that I like is a Ford N series. For the same reasons. Easy to work on, easy to find the information, and easy to get parts. Some of the guys that been around longer will have different ideas. Read them all. Watch YouTube. On YouTube watch to see if it looks easy for you more than if they tell you how easy something is. You can't always verify that what you hear on there is good. Watch what they do but ask your questions here
 

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Hello, welcome to ATF. Good advice from the post above. Good luck with your search.
 

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Welcome to the forum.
As far as purchasing old tractors, everyone will have their preferences, likes and dislikes.
And, if you really start enjoying them, one leads to two, then maybe however much room
you can make, to squeeze one more in the shed. It gets addictive like that.
Like the other guys said above, I would look at some youtube videos of some of the 40s
and 50s models and research some of them, and see which ones actually appealed to
me and interested me. Growing up here on the farm, My Dad had a 1949 model A John Deer,
a 1951 Model M john Deere, and a 1963 Model 1010 John Deere.
My Grandfather had a Ferguson Model 35. My Grandfather used to be all about Fergusons
and Massey Ferguson after the companies merged in the 50s, as he was a salesman at the local dealership. Our neighbor used to be all about Farmalls, as he farmed with a Farmall M and a Farmall H. In recent years, weve just collected what has appealed to us, and haven't really stayed with one brand. Some folks do. There is a sprinkling of John Deeres, Massey Harris, Farmall, Case and Ford in our collection as of now, and could change at any time, depending on the shed room.
 

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A Ford 8N is a good beginner tractor. Three point hitch for a bush hog or finish mower and a wide choice of other implements. Plenty of parts and info for them. An 8N has no independent pto so you would definitely need a pto overrunning clutch for safety when mowing or bushhogging. 8Ns were made from 48-52. A little newer model, mid to late 50s, maybe a 601 or 801 would have a live pto and a bit more power. Someone wil chime in on the first.live pto model I am sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input! Anymore is welcome. Came across this ford today. Not sure how difficult changing points are. Or what it requires. But would this be worth 1300?
20735
Description says it needs points changed.
 

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Yea, it should be, if it runs out good, and the engine is okay, dont smoke and the pto and hydraulics are good, and no weird knocking sounds. Tires and rims look good in the picture. Thats always a plus. Those little fords are fairly easy to get parts for as well. Check the oil for water or coolant before you buy it, as some fords, not all, sometimes get head or head gasket issues. We had to have a Ford NAA Jubilee rebuilt twice over a head issue, but i am just one person, and my experiences will be different to someone elses.
 

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I'd say it's worth a look for sure. Plenty of information about changing the points on YouTube and the I&T book, the Ns are FO-4 I think. Get it on the computer or at Tractor Supply. There's owners manuals and parts books available too, but that comes after you get a tractor. Take a look at YouTube and in books and forums before you leave to look at it. There's alot of information about what to look for when you buy. It will refresh I memory about things to look at and look for, listen to, that kind of thing. Good luck!
 

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There's something on the 3 point, too. If it's not in the description to sell, I'd dicker over it unless the ad specifically says not for sale. Even then, depending on how we're getting along I just might. One way or another one thing I never do is pay the first price quoted to me
 

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I would want to hear and see it run, and see the hydraulics work. If all it needs is points, the owner should make the repair so it will.run.
 

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I'm assuming that the ad says it needs points, but does it run?
I would have a hard time paying $1300 for an 80 year old tractor that didn't run.
I don't care how painted up it was. A 9N would be a '41 not a '51 but that could be just a type-o.
If it ran, but not well, I would offer him $950 for it. $600 if it doesn't run.
If it runs and operates good....it's not a great deal, if your looking to do a total restoration, but parts are easily available.
Location plays a role in price as well. Though Hillsboro ain't that far from KY.
It's around where Wendell (aka MMM) lives.
 

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The small Fords are a good starting point. For one thing they have the std three point system. Some other brands of that era do not. Maybe spend a little more and look at a good running 1953 Ford Jubilee. They are the next generation after the Ford you pictures and they are just very handy! They have average power, improved engine over the N series, easy to get on and off, very user friendly. That was my first big tractor about 8 years ago. After that it was all down hill with a endless stream of orange tin!:)


A very addictive, and can be expensive, hobby! Good luck!
I actually started with Cub Cadets, much smaller scale but just as addictive!:)
Regards,
Chris
 
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