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It is nearing the end of its life. These pics may be the last ones I take of it. I took them about 10 days ago when finishing the hay in the pasture. We did a final clean out during the 2019-2020 winter. Back in the early 80s, one internal supporting post began to sink. It was usually muddy at that spot. I don't know if the post rotted or the ground was just that soft. My dad, with failing health, and I added 2 or 3 more posts, tried to jack up the beam they supported, but it was a patchwork job at best. A bit later I dug down at that spot, poured several bags of concrete mix to make a pad for another post, but I think it had gone too far. The beam cracked and bowed downward, but never broke. One long wall at the rafter plate seemed to be pushing away so I added a come-along and a log chain across the inside of the barn from one wall to the other. It was used for small square bale storage for a other 35 years. The tax records on the house date it to the early 1900s. We traced the property back to being in our family since the 1840s. I am going to search for a pic or two that shows it in its better days.

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It's sad when a barn gets near the end of it's life. In my case the flooding of 1993 took care of a lot of those old barns.The levee was 40 foot tall and broke on its South end and flowed savagely North. It took ou machine sheds and knocked the round grain bins off their concrete pads. This was in Southeast Missouri along the Mississippi River
 
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