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Man we were late with hogs this year... last weekend we just finished 8 head. Never been this late in my life !!! Four weekends of beef butchering, then my head butcher/brother and his bride took a long float trip to Hawaii and back...Thanks to heaven above for refrigeration because for years butchering was always limited to cold weather. I'm 'piggin' out on some fresh stuffed breakfast sausage, eggs and toast this very minute....
 
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Glad ya got em all chopped and packaged. Hope to buy a spare freezer this year as the boys hope to deer hunt the property and we also want to get a side of beef as well. Sure wish I was down there enjoying that pork right about now. Sounds delicious........................................
 

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Not a lot of things much better than fresh homade sausage. I can smell it from here :!:
 

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i miss old fashion hog killings like we use to do around here, it was not uncommon for all the uncles, and neighbors to hual there hogs here, (We had access to free gas so we had a pit with gas burners under the scalding box, no wood to fool with) and we basically set up an assembly line, men folk did the shooting and bleeding,and gutting, bigger boys on the scalding box, (i always got stuck on the scalding box with a butcher knive to scrap the hair off), uncles would cut it up, the women and girls would work the meat, and make and can sauage, granny ran the lard kettle, and grandaddy supervised the salt box, i remember one time we killed over 20 hogs in one day
i can still tase the egg and brian breakfast the next morning
 

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ky wonder said:
i miss old fashion hog killings like we use to do around here, it was not uncommon for all the uncles, and neighbors to hual there hogs here, (We had access to free gas so we had a pit with gas burners under the scalding box, no wood to fool with) and we basically set up an assembly line, men folk did the shooting and bleeding,and gutting, bigger boys on the scalding box, (i always got stuck on the scalding box with a butcher knive to scrap the hair off), uncles would cut it up, the women and girls would work the meat, and make and can sauage, granny ran the lard kettle, and grandaddy supervised the salt box, i remember one time we killed over 20 hogs in one day
i can still tase the egg and brian breakfast the next morning
Yessir, that is verrrrrrrry similar to the way we did it years ago. Except we used sawmill slabs for the scalding vat because it was 7 maybe 8 feet long and slabs was easier to slide all the way in. We used "bell" double end scrapers to scrape and then shave with a butcher knife any fine hair that was missed. Dad insisted on 144 degree water, not any hotter because too hot of water would "set" the hair on the hog and make it much more difficult to scrape. We'd add ashes to the water to soften the hair (apparently) because when we'd pull the hog outta the vat, you could literally swipe your hand down its back and huge piles would just slip off. That lasted only a short while because they'd start cooling immediately. Four guys scraping at a time. We'd do 12, maybe 14 head at a time back then. Remember the women cleaning the guts ?? They'd use a soda straw to blow into one end with the guts in a pan of water, then with a DULL butter knife scrape and scrape (and repeat) on a sycamore or soft maple board propped up to their chest from in the dishpan of water. Over and over until clean !!! I NEVER had to do that myself !!!! Thank the Good Lord Above for synthetic casings !!!! AHHHHhhhhhhh.... the good old days, huh. :shock: :shock:
 

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how about them hand slung chitterlings :lol:

i still have a good scalding box hanging in the barn, and have given some thought to raising some hogs and killing them.

back in 1983, grandaddy at 77 years of age built a new smokehouse, so he and i went and bought a hog and killed it, and salted the meat and hung it in the new smoke house,

a couple days later i saw smoke coming from the smokehouse and i asked grandad what he built the fire in, and he said he built it on a metal barrel top, i asked if he put bricks under it, and he said no.

so i went and looked and the fire on the metal top laying on the floor had caught the floor afire, and burnt a hole in the floor.
i kicked the hot metal out the door and grandad and i replaced the burnt boards, put the barrel top on some bricks and rebuilt the fire.

i enjoyed that meat and it was the last hog that grandad and i killed, the next summer he sold the smokehouse to a neighbor.

i now have a unused 24' 6 ring steel grain bin, with a concrete floor, that i have thought about building some racks in and turning into a smokehouse

that would be hard to set on fire :D

meat dont taste like it did back then, and i am missing the days when bacon was cut off a salted and smoked slab,with a butcherknive, and not pealed from a plastic package.

there was always a slab of bacon, or a country ham hanging in the kitchen, in a white cotton bag, as we grew up, not in the refrigerator
 

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Hot dang, KyWonder !!! Now you are talking !! Dad always salt cured the hams, shoulders and bacons. Had a huge wall hung box with small mesh wire all around the outside to keep out the mice. Every day or two he'd rub in the cure and roll 'em over a turn.

We always made head cheese...tails, jowels, tongues, ears, pig knuckles, hearts, and others parts in a 60" kettle. I've never seen another one and my much older brother still has that kettle in his shed today.

My favorite time was flipping back the partial lid and stirring with a home made oar-like paddle, steam and cooked meat aroma flooding my face. A huge stainless steel ladle, maybe 6" diameter would scoop out some of the goodies and if lucky would yield a half-heart or a tongue when no one was looking. Sneak into the woodshed with a pocket knife and salt shaker, slice into chunks and devour !!! Occasionally one of us young'uns would sneak a little sip out of the home made grape wine reserved for the adults.

Then of course came the lard rendering and squeezing with the lard press. MMMmmmmm, still remember the cracklin's to this day....pure unadulterated cholesterol laden FAT !!! And nobody cared !!!! Man was that stuff good, or what ??

I remember after coming home from the Marine Coprs, scalding hogs in that old vat, the process now moved to my brothers house and shed, I had brought home a military issue one piece flight suit for winter use. Man was that thing warm...REAL warm. I was stuck on the back end of the vat straddling from side to side to make sure she stayed under and my backside was a rubbing on the flu stack and melted the whole rear end out of my new Uncle Sam issue flight suit !!! REAL WARM , indeed !! :oops: :oops:
 

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Gosh you 2 guys in above post bring back some good memories of hog killing days , That it exacally the way we done it. Two or 3 neigbors would get together and butcher 10 or 12 hogs together. My mom would fry down sausage for several days . Don't buy sausage like the way my seasoned it . Any time our family needed meat ,we had it farm raised . beef , Pork or chicken . You all bring back a lot of sweet memories .



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its a shame that we are not doing this today, my kids at least know how to skin a deer, but would be clueless when it came too killing hogs and putting up the meat at home.
i swear that this thread has me thinking seriously about raising some hogs and killing them here at home

this was a custom of the time , that is missed, it brought families & neighbors together for a day of work and socializing.

back years ago in my 16th year,i helped my best friends dad kill hogs, one day,
and at the end of the day he asked what he owed me,
i told him nothing that i ate as much at his house as i did my on,
so i walked home, to get cleaned up for that nights trip with my friend ( he had a nice car, i didn't)
to town to check out the girls that would be cruising the local kid hangouts

when he came to pick me up, he brought two paper wrapped packages of meat,
that his dad sent to me, for working that day, it was the tenderloin off a nice hog.

after a night of cruising and steaming up the windows in the car with the girls we met
breakfast the next morning was hot bisquits, gravy and tenderloin,
man was that a good memory to bring back :eek:


bisquits, and tenderloin was good also ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
bettyp said:
Gosh you 2 guys in above post bring back some good memories of hog killing days , That it exacally the way we done it. Two or 3 neigbors would get together and butcher 10 or 12 hogs together. My mom would fry down sausage for several days . Don't buy sausage like the way my seasoned it . Any time our family needed meat ,we had it farm raised . beef , Pork or chicken . You all bring back a lot of sweet memories .
Betty, my middle daughter just joined the forum yesterday and she is becoming our official sausage maker now that she is out of college and working. She and her boyfriend, and my older daughter and son in law just used the old two gallon sausage press and cased just over 80 pounds of sausage on Sunday. We made cajun, Italian, spicy Italian, breakfast, bratwurst and pizza seasoning, all in casings. Then at least 60 pounds were vacume sealed in 1 1/2 pound flat packs.

Monday evening, my son in law, myself and a buddy, DozerDave, sliced all 16 slabs of bacon while the ladies of the family vacume sealed them in 1 pound flat packs. My much older brother and my nephew sliced all the hams into ham steaks and de-boned a few hams for later slicing.

Promptly following the slicing, we devoured fresh bacon and hot flap-jacks slathered in maple syrup for supper !!! Man, was I stuffed !!! :D :D :D

So now, for sure, we are done with butchering for another year....
 

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Well well well, KyWonder, I don't know which part of your younger years I liked reading about the most...tenderloin, bisquits and gravy OR cruising the local spots as a 16 year old... :D Oh YEAHHhhhhhhhhhhh..... :cool: :cool: :cool:

And Betty, I remember the salt cures shoulders and hams very well. We would cut thick slices and boil them in a pot for breakfast to soak out some of the saltiness. We'd have to take the butcher knife down to the smoke house and cut a chunk or two off one of them for a meal. The hide was always left on while hanging and cut off as needed. You would've been very welcome to some flapjacks and bacon.... :D :D
 

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Back when we still scalded the hogs, I was in charge of the water kettles. That was real fun trying to keep enough hot water when you scalded 6 or 7 hogs. Now we just skin them as we no longer have the enough help to scald that many. We still mix our own cure for the bacons and hams.
 

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We used to scald them here, but now pressure wash them and use heavy duty clippers to de-hair them.
 

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Jim in NC said:
We used to scald them here, but now pressure wash them and use heavy duty clippers to de-hair them.
Jim, I guess that would qualify you as a regular ' boot camp barber '...That's how they peeled my head on the first day :x :oops: :( :( Except for the pressure washer anyway....
 

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missouri massey man said:
[quote="Jim in NC":2nhryvwz]We used to scald them here, but now pressure wash them and use heavy duty clippers to de-hair them.
Jim, I guess that would qualify you as a regular ' boot camp barber '...That's how they peeled my head on the first day :x :oops: :( :( Except for the pressure washer anyway....[/quote:2nhryvwz]


The piggies are washed off before and after clipped. Speakin' of barbering, I did cut some dorm mates hair in college, and still cut my own most of the time now. :shock: It is just a part of trying to be self sufficient.
 
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