Antique Tractors Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
1949 Case VAC
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I picked up this '49 Case VAC today with the intent to get her running and eventually restore her. It looks like she's has the 12v conversion done all ready so that's good. I haven't had an opportunity to do much other than a visual inspection. I trust the owner when he says she ran 3 yrs ago but no attempts have been made since.

I know some of the cosmetic stuff I'll need to replace like the front wheels etc, but where does a guy start with these?

Also, I can tell from the serial she's a '49, but I'm unsure what kind of hitch I'm looking at. It doesn't appear to be an Eagle, but there is one line that runs under the drive shaft behind the air filter that appears to be hydraulic...

Any observations, ID'S or tips for where to start would be greatly appreciated!

Tire Wheel Plant Land vehicle Vehicle
Vehicle Motor vehicle Wood Gas Automotive exterior
Motor vehicle Vehicle Wood Automotive tire Gas
Tire Wheel Plant Vehicle Tractor
Tire Wheel Plant Automotive tire Motor vehicle
Vehicle Tire Wheel Plant Automotive tire
Wheel Tire Plant Vehicle Motor vehicle
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
4,415 Posts
If you can get it running that would be a good place to start. That way you can tell what needs repaired and what leaks.
All States Ag ( tractorpartsasap.com ) is a good place to find used o.e.m. and new aftermarket parts.
Steiner's Tractor parts and many others have new aftermarket parts. A Google search will turn up a plethora of part suppliers.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,630 Posts
It does not have to look pretty to run and work. Some of the following you may know. I suggest an operators manual and service.manual at the very least. Also I check fluids, especially engine oil, to make sure is it oil only, no coolant or water. The same goes for the cooling system. The fuel tank, lines, and carb should be clean. Its easy to look inside the tank. It no rust or gunk in there I'd have to pour some gas in it and remove drain from carb bowl and see if fuel would run through the system. Check transmission oil too, mainly to insure there was oil there. Having gone that far I would check for spark and see what it would do. Many years ago I bougbt a Farmall Cub from my stepfather's frend. It had been parked for several years. It was the color of rust. After an hour or so we had it running, drove it on the trailer, and brought it home. Get it going if possible so you can see what you have, then the real work will begin.
 

·
Registered
1949 Case VAC
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Jim in NC, thank you, this is exactly the kind of advice I was looking for. I have a repair manual on the way and I'm gonna order a reproduction owners manual soon. I've got lots of experience repairing mechanisms, but once you introduce fluids, my practical experience is lacking.

I'm a little timid to try and fire it up cuz with my luck, I fear it would knock some gunk lose in those closed systems and just further fowl things up. Though I'm sure these old engines are fairly bulletproof with their looser tolerances. Has that been your experience?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,630 Posts
My opinions are my own but I believe a runing engine can clean itself over a little time with changing fluids and actual use of the tractor. Using detergent oils , maybe some seafoam thrown in, or a little diesel fuel in the mix can knock loose sludge and the like. If you are a bit leary of trying to crank it, use a hand crank, or some means to turn over the engine by hand to see if the engine is free or makes any strange noise. If free you can bump or jog it with the starter too.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Mossback

·
Registered
1949 Case VAC
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hmm. I had never hear of mixing in diesel. I'll have to look into that. So, with the hand crank, could I just engage the belt pulley and roll that a couple times?
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top