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I am making a photo book for my father-in-law that will catalog and describe his old farm tools. He grew up in rural Oletha, Texas during the 1950s and 60s. He has several old tools that belonged to his father and grand-father, who were both farmers. I am interesting in finding out as much as possible about each tool: the official name, some historical or geographical facts, what they were used for, and any other information about them. I know a tiny bit about some of them, but any more information would be most appreciated!!!
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Item 1: a scale of some sort


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Item 2: a weed whacker???

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Item 3: an old wedge? what used for?

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Item 4: what is this, and why the weird shape?

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Item 5: a long type of saw. What is it called?

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Item 6: a twine spool, what would this be for?

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Item 7: a long, VERY heavy bar. Name, what used for?
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Item 8: Long saw? What used for, what called?
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Item 9: A farm hoe? Any experience/stories with this?
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Item 10: no idea what this is. For a plow?
 

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1 is part of a set of scales. The bar would have markings on it and cut outs where the counterweight was hung. I see no counter weights that would.go with it. I grew up calling 2 a sling blade, used mostly on taller weeds and grasses, and i still use one occasionally. 3 and 7 are pruning saws. 4 is a wrench that came with and used on an implement or a wood burning stove. A side view of 3 would help. I see no wedge shape in the pic. The twine holder and eyelet, I have no clue. The eyelet prevents the twine.from tangling. 7 is a pry bar, 9 a scraping tool, and 10 is a hand forged ring most likely used in an animal harness or for a lighter use chain. My guesses.
 

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I think the twine would be for laying off your rows straight in a garden. Just my guess. My grandfather had a push spade/plow, and he had a setup like that, where he would drive a tobacco stick or stob, attach the twine, and run it to the out to the other end of the garden, eye it, then stake it. and make his row beside the twine to make straight garden rows.
 

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I think Jim pretty much covered you. Like he said, the first is a scale. At Old Sturbridge Village they have one in the grist mill for weighing grain.They call it a steelyard which I never did quite get and can't remember if they could explain it. The second a weed whacker just like you said. I don't remember ever calling it anything else. The third looks kind of narrow but my only guess is a splitting wedge. I would have thought it would have a relief cut in the face too but...... The wrench probably from a wagon. each fitting had a reason. Most likely the biggest for the wheel nuts,the next one maybe a jam nut, and the small one probably fit every other square nut on the wagon or cart. The next saw I can only imagine is a pruning saw. The twine makes sense for laying off rows like RJ said. I wouldn't have thought they'd bother with the holder, that makes me think more like they were wrapping meat butchered right on the farm. The pry bar. My first guess for the next one is a hay knife, but it's a little hard to see for sure. 9th is what we used to call an onion hoe. And the last the first thing in my mind is a calabash ring for an ox yoke. These are all just guesses, and I'm sure there's some that know them better than me. There might even be a little regional dialect between some of them
 

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My thoughts on number 6 would be the string used in old general merchandise stores to tie up the brown paper they used to wrap purchases in.
 

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My thoughts on number 6 would be the string used in old general merchandise stores to tie up the brown paper they used to wrap purchases in.
That was my first thought but he hadn't mentioned a store so I got thinking they picked it up somehow and how would they use it on the farm
 

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That was my first thought but he hadn't mentioned a store so I got thinking they picked it up somehow and how would they use it on the farm
I remember my grandparents, (and my folks to a certain extent) used string to tie together a lot of things. From Christmas presents to spare flat chain links to a piece of machinery. They used it much the way we use duct tape and zippy ties. I imagine they found very creative ways to use it.
 

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#2....most folks just call a swing blade, but some folks still call them a smith hoe.
#3....looks like a felling wedge to me.
#5 ...a double sided pruning saw, but I think the handle is homemade. I've never seen one with a long handle just a handsaw handle.
#7....pry bar
#8....a pole saw (pruning saw WITH a long handle)
#9....a warren hoe, but it reckon it might be called an onion hoe in Texas.
What I always heard called an onion hoe , aka beet hoe, was flat across the blade.
Looked like someone cut a garden hoe short then sharpened all three sides.
The cotton string would seem better suited for tying produce. My first thought was tobacco, but I don't think it's grown in Texas.
The last one reminds me of a link from a chain when folks still tied up their elephants. So your guess is as good as mine.
 

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Tool number two is what we call an idiot stick...I still use one from time to time. Is that saying something about me?
 

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I see we haven't replied to this one in awhile but I couldn't resist adding a different picture of number 2
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