Antique Tractors Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is my first restore project involving a tractor of any kind. I’ve restored 9 automobiles. With autos, the radiators can be pressured tested, even the Model A Ford I restored that wasn’t a pressurized system. Is there a way to test the radiator before I get it all mounted to the tractor?

Same question for the oil pump. On automobiles, I insert a rod down into the oil pump and turn it with a ½ inch drill. I don’t see that being possible with this Model B. I would like to make sure it is pumping before I get it all assembled and then find out it isn’t working.

Suggestions please.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
Test the radiator just like any other low pressure unit. I mean just use a few pounds of pressure, not ten or twenty. Don't know bout the oil pump.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
The problem, as I see it is that the radiator cap hole is pretty large to plug to pressure test (about 3+ inches). The vent tube is easy. Then there is the bottom hole. What does one use to plug these up so they can do a decent test. Rags worn't work even at 5 pounds. I figure a proper test should hold pressure for at least 30 minutes with no leaks.

Any thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
906 Posts
Sorry, I didn't know that the fill hole was so large. Still to check for leaks you need to seal and put a couple of pounds of pressure on it. Course them old radiators can't stand much pressure!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
About the oil pump, looks like you can’t test the pump with the pump in the engine. If the crank was out of the way, you could remove the oil lines from the pump and remove the pump form the block. Then submerge the pump in oil and turn the pump shaft to see if it pumps. This would be the last resort.

This weekend, I got my Model B running with a carburetor. I didn’t have one to put on till now.
At first there was no oil pressure but I adjusted the oil pressure adjustment on the clutch side of the block and there it was Oil pressure. I adjusted it to the mid-point on the gauge.

Also, just so I would know more about the oiling system, I removed the entire oil system from my parts tractor and reassembled it on my work bench. I put all of the lines back on and have them pointing pretty close to where they would be if still in the engine block.

The spare pump I removed from the parts tractor had a broken part where the stud that is used to hold the bottom of the oil filter can on the engine. Someone tightened it way too tight and broke the cast iron top out.

With this all on my bench, I was thinking of making a better video of how a Model Deere oil system works and where all of the oil lines go. The one that is out there now doesn’t answer some questions I had.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top