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Wendall this sure does bring back a lot of memories. When I went yo work in the boiler room at IBM we had three steam 1,000 ton steam chillers,four steam feed water pumps and one large steam air compressor that ran 24hrs a day in case we lost power we had a large generator that would keep the boilers running and the steam air compressor would produce enough air to keep all the air handlers from going down in the entire plant.In April 1974 we had an outbreak of tornado's in central KY we lost power in lexington so the governors on the old steam air compressor opened up and it ran at full speed till power came back on which was about 12 hrs later and we never lost any of the air handlers in the plant. I know that we have got a lot more modern in later years but I still think that steam should have a place in the workplace. Thanks for the story of the box factory I really enjoyed the trip down memory lane.

Don Davidson
 

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Ok Wendell I've watched the video twice and all I can say is amazing. The knowledge in that building boggles my mind. Coming from a long line of cobblers it is a inspiration. Not to say anything is cobbled in that setup, far from it. To think about the men that figured out the gearing and power is nothing short of a wonder. I would love to be able to spend a day at that place just to see it all work. The people working there have it dawn pat to. Its funny how in watching the video you kind of see things that remind you of your on family, every thing a little old and probably a little stubborn but still gets the job done. :) Thanks for posting.
 

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don32040 said:
Wendall this sure does bring back a lot of memories.

I didn't know you'd worked on steam, that must have been some really neat stuff to troubleshoot and repair. My high pressure steam experience was pretty much limited to installation and start up and not a great deal of that either. Mostly low pressure steam is what I worked on. The last hospital job I did though was a small 100 hp 125 psi steam boiler just for redundancy in the autoclave sterilization and domestic water heat exchanger circuits. I was just certain though that of all people you and Gordon would enjoy the machinery and the processes shown in the video.

You fellows that did that work continually really earned your paycheck Don. There's a lot of young fellows out there now that wouldn't consider working in those extreme environments. Some of our little boiler rooms would easily be in excess of 110 degrees continually. Not all, but some.

Yessir, there were some hard working people that video too....that little lady looked like she knew her way around it from stem to stern !!! I was wondering which machine bobbed off the dogs tail. :lol: :lol:
 

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That would be an amazing place to visit. I have worked on some belt driven elevator equipment that was installed in the early 1900s. Earliest 1904.
Just at the turn from steam to electric power. Still being used moving material in some old warehouses, and factories around Kentucky and Ohio cities,
and one Plumber's Supply building in Louisville. At least before I retired about three and a half years ago. I was impressed at it's complexly simple design,
if that makes sense. Fun part was making a piece when one broke, or wore out. Not anywhere can you buy parts for a 100 year old elevator machine.
I'd be like a kid in a candy store walking around that place and seeing how everything worked. ;)
 
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