Antique Tractors Forum banner
1 - 20 of 84 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!! I'm brand new to Antique tractors. Besides seeing my grandfathers collections and always loving them I know very little about them. I just bought a 1947 Model B that has not been run in what looks like quite a while. The body appears to be in reasonable shape, but it had some modifications made over the years. It appears it was changed over to a 12 volt system with an alternator replacing the generator. Although someone cut the wires off of the alternator. Anyway I'm looking for some feedback as to getting her running. I plan on changing all of the fluids, cleaning the tank and the radiator, cleaning the carb, and throwing a new battery in. I'm hoping you guys can help me with a few suggestions as to where I need to start. Thanks so much in advance!
 

·
-Willy-
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
The alternator is a cheaper replacement to the generator and regulator.

A one wire GM alternator will cost about $50. A John Deere generator is about $250 - $399 depending on where you get it (doesnt matter 12 or 6 volt they are all pricey). The regulator will cost you another $50. When you get the two of them, before you mount them on the tractor, you need to visit a alternator shop and get the regulator tuned to the generator. Otherwise it is a good way to throw away the money you just spent. This is probably why they went to the alternator.
6 volt turns over slow and starts hard. 12 volt will spin it right over and get you going quicker. It is your choice. Just remember, it is human not to leave it alone as the last owner did and feel everything needs to be changed (regardless of if it does).

As to the fluids, I suggest you get a generic repair manual available at any tractor vendor. I dont think John Deere still sells it yet you can try.
From Steiners it is about $50

To get it running, hook up a battery and spin her over. Maybe a shot of ether into the throat of the carb to see if she will fire. I wouldnt bother to pull the radiator unless it leaks. Otherwise typical John Deere it can be 2 hours of work to get the fragile radiator off. Remember, this is a John Deere, not an automobile. The old adage "nothing runs like a Deere" does not apply to how to service them. If she fires, then hook up a temporary fuel tank or trust the one you have and give her some fresh gas.

The transmission (if it has been stored outside) will have water in it. That is regular 90w gear oil.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the info Lovesthedrive!! I'm not gonna have a chance to mess with her until next week or so, in the meantime should I pour some marvel mystery oil down the cylinders to help with lubrication? I ordered a service manual on Amazon for 20 bucks and it should be here next week.

Thanks soundguy! I posted some pics in my photo album and will take some pics of the axle as time allows. Any more information is appreciated!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
849 Posts
A little MMO or transmission fluid down the cylinders would be great, keep in mind though that it's a JD so you're only lubing the bottom of the cylinder since the cylinders are horizontal. Of you have an oil can with a flexible hose maybe you could bend it up and snake it through the plug hole to get a little lube on the top of the bores. Good luck with the tractor!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
maybee shoot some pb blaster or kroil in thru the plug holes with a spray straw.. give it some good shots. that stuff should wick around the rings with capilary action.. etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Just sprayed the cylinders down with PB blaster. I'm gonna let it soak a few days than change the oil and than give her a go.

Soundguy I added a picture of the axle on my photo album.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Since someone previously cut the wires from my alternator can someone tell me where those wires are supposed to go? Currently the only wires I see intact are from the battery to the starter switch. The wiring for the lights and ammeter have also been cut.

Since the system has been upgraded to 12 volt I'm assuming I no longer need the voltage regulator?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
If your alternator has a built in regulator, the external voltage regulator is not needed. But, by reading your post you have a multi-wire alternator which probably doesn't have the regulator built in.

This diagram should help you. B-3-Jpeg.jpg
 

·
-Willy-
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
Here is a pic of a one wire alternator. Yes it is now green and now longer brushed grey. grin

IMG_20120506_050956.jpg

By the way, I do have a smaller pulley on it so it will charge near idle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
If you buy a fresh alternator try to get a lower output model, easier on the fan drive gears

Once you get the engine spinning freely make sure it will show oil pressure on a guage, it is common in colder climates for the pump drive to get broken from ice build up in the pump,
I always mix 2 stroke oil at about 20 to 1 in the first fire up gas to get some lube to the cylinders
Check you crankshaft endplay and make sure the flywheel clamp bolts are tight while you are checking things over.

If you change the plug wires order wire core , suppression core limits the spark too much and usually fail quickly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
224 Posts
The 48 that I just rebuilt is a parade queen and I have not connected the generator, just the 12 volt battery to starter. I keep it on a battery minder that keeps it trickled charged. What I am saying is that unless you will run the lights frequently, you do not really need to connect the generator or alternator. Maybe later, I’ll wire one up but right now, it always starts right up because they are mag driven.

Best of luck with your 47.
 

·
-Willy-
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
Model T Ford's when they first had electric start also had no generator. You would use it till the battery was dead. Granted back then you had to go 5 miles or so to a charging station.

Regular use you should be able to get 2 weeks use, points will not pull that much on a good group 24 car battery.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Excuse me gentlemen but I too just bought my first JD, a 1948 Model B that has been converted to 12 volt negative ground and alternator. Alternator wasn't wired correctly and wouldn't charge. Fixed that and got the thing excited and charging again. Now I find a 12 volt generator at grand dad's place and would like to switch back to keep everything original. Can I keep the negative ground arrangement or have to go back to positive ground? If I go back to positive ground how do I make the starter turn the right direction? We'll talk about what I found in the gear case later. Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
849 Posts
I think you just have to polarize the generator when you switch back. Pretty sure that's it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Oldmedic

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Thanks Ernie N. I've heard the term but I'll have to google how to do it. Strangely enough it seems that all you have to do. Seems starter motors are not polarity sensitive. Life should be JD simple.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for the replies!! I finally got a little time to work on her. I removed the hood and fuel tank and cleaned the tank using some nails with a couple bottles of the works toilet cleaner to remove the rust down to bare metal. Then I coated the inside of the tank with 2 stroke oil to prevent any further rusting. I removed the Carb and have that soaking in some solvent before I rebuild it. I drained the engine oil, rear end, and power trol and was pretty shocked to find about 2.5 gallons of water came out of the rear end before the lube. Also about a quart of water came out of the engine before the oil. I cannot understand how that amount of water could have gotten in there.

Anyway i allowed that to drain and flushed the engine with some fresh oil before refilling and replacing the filter. The engine turns over freely, so I'm happy to see that. I put 2 new spark plugs in and put 3 gallons of diesel in the rear end to flush the gunk out of there. I've jacked up the rear end and have been hand cranking the wheels over to clean it all out. I charged the battery that was in it and the starter is turning the flywheel, so I'm very happy to see that. I removed the old alternator and bought a new single wire alternator that I have to install. I'm hoping to have the carb reinstalled soon and to get her started!! The rear end seems to roll very smoothly and the water that was in there was completely seperated from the oil. I just need to figure out how that amount of water could have gotten in.
 

·
-Willy-
Joined
·
1,420 Posts
The gear shift is not rain tight. Our tractors get left out side and the rain fills up the rear end through the gear shift. As to the engine oil. Some of the boxer engines have a small split in the cylinder block so that coolant weeps into the block. A simple radiator drain in the drain plugs and to remember to drain off the water before each run is all it takes. A friend of mine one Virgil White of California had a B with the same problem. Apparently it is fairly common item. My transmission needs to be drained as well every week on my 60.
 
1 - 20 of 84 Posts
Top