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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was just reading about the new regs that are to go into affect. Will this affect any of you all that do the Farmers Markets? What got my attention was the use of manure as fertilizer.
 

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Don't use any on my stuff, and not too worried about FDA regs. I want stuff to be safe cuz we eat it too!!!I personally think there is not enough people empowered to enforce all these regs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Jim in NC said:
Don't use any on my stuff, and not too worried about FDA regs. I want stuff to be safe cuz we eat it too!!!I personally think there is not enough people empowered to enforce all these regs.
Oh I agree Jim just was curious if there were going to be some kind of certifications or what the article was a little hard to understand.Know this probably is more for imports but seems like it always affects the wrong people when they do these things.

Funny been using manure on mine for over 40yrs and grew up with it being the only fertilizer used and haven't poisoned anyone yet :? :?
 

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I would not be afraid to use it Mike. It is just not practical for me. If you knew how some countries used manure, especially China, it could potentially make you very ill.
 

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From what I have read it doesn't seem like it will be too hard at all on the small time producers and it seems as though a lot of what they are talking about on the farm level is building off of what many considered "voluntary good practice" from the start. We don't fertilize with manure ourselves, I have no problems with it - it has just never been a convenient option for us. For those that do on a small scale I don't know how much it will effect them as it seems that it is targeted more on the large operations, if I'm reading it right. Sounds like it is targeted more at the "big" outfits from what I understand, larger than anything our little farm will ever do. Good point in bringing it up though, Mike as there is a lot to think about with this.
 

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Stephenscity said:
I was just reading about the new regs that are to go into affect. Will this affect any of you all that do the Farmers Markets? What got my attention was the use of manure as fertilizer.
i was wondering tor my curiosity what is the deal on manure as fertilizer up here we can only apply amount per acre and only apply when ground isnt frozen so it goes in and doesnt run off thanks
 

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Hey Mike can you post a link to what you found. I followed Brandon's link, but got the runaround to several broken links trying to find any new regulations. :?
 

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Going to have to find my site again, Dave. The link I posted does not go to what I found... I should have checked it before the post. That's odd though, let me try and find it again.
 

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It seems that the site I looked at last night is now a broken link, as I get the 404 File or Directory not found when I try and access it - that's somewhat odd. Sorry for the confusion, Dave and anybody else who clicked my link to go to something completely irrelevant.
 

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Yep, that's what I kept getting Brandon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
BigDaveinKY said:
Hey Mike can you post a link to what you found. I followed Brandon's link, but got the runaround to several broken links trying to find any new regulations. :?
Dave wasn't a link it was an article in our local paper. Will see what I can find Recycle has already gone but will see if they published online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is the article as published in the Northern Va. Daily Like I said it was a little sketchey.

New federal rules are coming to farms and food processing plants in a bid to curtail disease outbreaks.

Earlier this month, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released proposed regulations overhauling the food industry and invited public comment.

They stem from the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011, according to Ryan Davis, program manager for the Virginia Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Division of Animal and Food Industry Services -- Office of Dairy and Foods.

Reported outbreaks of food-borne illnesses have been on the rise, partly because more of them can be linked to a common source, he said.

"I think there's a need, and Congress saw a need, to upgrade or modernize our food safety system," Davis said. "It's really more reactive in nature, rather than proactive."

The crux of FSMA was the creation of five new regulations for producers, manufacturers and storers of food, he said.

"They're looking at farm to table protection, basically," Davis explained.

Two regulations were released earlier this month, and are the subject of a 120-day comment period. They are the proposed Produce Safety regulation and the proposed Food Safety Preventative Controls regulation.

The FDA doesn't have the personnel to inspect every food manufacturer, Davis said. Instead, the agency contracts with states to provide those services.

In Virginia, the FDA does some of the inspections, while the VDACS does some, too, according to Davis.

The 2011 act also would establish a national food safety system, he said. The system is currently fragmented, Davis said.

"So, in essence, everyone can be on a level playing field," Davis said. "We're all looking for the same things.

"One of the issues that became quite evident over the last few years is that a lot of the fruits or vegetables that we had thought were safe are not safe."

In the last few years, about 130 disease outbreaks led to 14,000 illnesses and 34 deaths linked to produce, Davis said.

"There are really six components to the produce safety rule, and many of these are components that have been identified as issues in the past in terms of avenues of contamination for raw agricultural produce," he said.

David said the standards wouldn't apply to foods meant to be cooked before they're eaten.

One of the standards relates to water supply. Some farms use pond water, which could be contaminated, he said. Another relates to soil. For instance, if manure is used as a fertilizer, time intervals could be established.

"Another issue is the health and hygiene of the workers," Davis said.

Many workers aren't aware of sanitation issues, especially when it comes to fecal to oral contamination, he said.

An additional issue is fecal contamination from domestic and wild animals in fields or on produce. Davis said.

"A couple of special requirements have to do with sprouts," he said.

Some sprouts are contaminated at the seed level, so the seeds would need treatment, Davis said.

"[The FDA is] hoping that given all of these requirements, that they're going to minimize the potential for contamination with respect to raw agricultural product," he said. "It's going to cover a lot of farms. They're estimating about 90 percent of the agricultural produce that's consumed in the U.S. is going to be covered by the regulation."

The amount of time farms have to comply will vary depending on size, Davis said.

On the manufacturing and food storage side, the FDA estimates the regulation will cover about 100,000 domestic facilities, and also will cover some foreign ones, according to Davis.

There really aren't any controls in place at some food production establishments currently, he said.

The new regulation will require food warehouses, packers and similar businesses to conduct hazard analyses, Davis said.

"Then, they're going to be required to put controls in place to minimize those hazards," he said.

Examples would involve food allergens, sanitation issues and recall protocols.

The food safety plans would have to be evaluated every three years by the manufacturers, Davis said.

"They're going to be required to keep records of preventative controls, of the monitoring that's been done, any corrective actions that need to occur," he said.

Some establishments would be exempt, such as farms producing small amounts of low-risk foods, or those selling foods that have already been identified as extremely hazardous and already have stringent regulations in place, such as low-acid canned foods, according to Davis.

Other regulations scheduled to come from FSMA relate to importing food, third-party certification and animal feed, Davis said.

As both a grower and a producer, National Fruit Product Co. in Winchester would be affected by both regulations. CEO David Gum said they believe they have a handle on most of it.

"Overall, I think it's a good thing," he said.

He said he expects his company's comments would come through the associations it's a part of, such as the Apple Processors Association.

"We kind of applaud it," Gum said of the proposed regulations. "A lot of that stuff we're already doing. I think the one thing we applaud the most would be the FDA's going to put some requirements on the importers.

"That's certainly one of our major concerns because we obviously compete with a lot of foreign foods in the apple segment. Obviously, we want to make sure that they have to abide by the same rules, and for our industry, we certainly want safe products and safe food."
 

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Thanks Mike, you're right really no specifics in that article. We've used "barn squeezins" all my life and never had anyone get sick or die from eating what grew.
That's how I was taught to plant tomato sets. Dig a hole 6" deep add 2" of "barn squeezins", two inches of dirt, drop in the plant, water well, and cover the roots.
Never had any that ever tasted like manure. :? ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BigDaveinKY said:
Thanks Mike, you're right really no specifics in that article. We've used "barn squeezins" all my life and never had anyone get sick or die from eating what grew.
That's how I was taught to plant tomato sets. Dig a hole 6" deep add 2" of "barn squeezins", two inches of dirt, drop in the plant, water well, and cover the roots.
Never had any that ever tasted like manure. :? ;)
I like that never heard that term before gonna remember that one :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Each spring it was an annual event to spread the manure pile, the accumulation of the winters dairy cattle. Across the fields and in the garden plots alike. More regulation is just additional manure being spread by the MAN. (of the typical "BULL" variety, that is) :? :? BigDave, I'd not heard it labled with that particularly endearing term before either....."barn squeezins" just has a smooth, yet semi-clumpy ring to it......
 

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I wonder if "barn squeezins" could be explained to city folks :?: :idea: :eek: :lol:
 

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Jim in NC said:
I wonder if "barn squeezins" could be explained to city folks :?: :idea: :eek: :lol:
I don't think so. If you aint steped in it,shoveled it or hit it with a front tractor tire running to fast something would be lost in the translation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
gordon1121 said:
Jim in NC said:
I wonder if "barn squeezins" could be explained to city folks :?: :idea: :eek: :lol:
I don't think so. If you aint steped in it,shoveled it or hit it with a front tractor tire running to fast something would be lost in the translation.
That was one of the reasons I always prefered tractors with fenders :lol: :lol: :lol:
Jim they'd just turn up their nose thinking it got in their maters :) ;)
 

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I had a customer ask last year if our produce was "organic." I told her no then I asked her to identify what organic meant to her. I got some convoluted, scholastic answer. I responded that I did not believe that anybody really knew what "organic" was cuz the definition of it keeps changing. It was an interesting "conversation."
 

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gordon1121 said:
Jim in NC said:
I wonder if "barn squeezins" could be explained to city folks :?: :idea: :eek: :lol:
I don't think so. If you aint steped in it, shoveled it, or hit it with a front tractor tire running to fast something would be lost in the translation.
I could add a few more, but I think Gordon sumed it up pretty well. :D
Jim, I wish I'd have been there to hear that "conversation".
Barn squezzins' is what I started callin' it when I was a youngin'. Made since to me. ;)
 
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