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Grew up farming, wound up being a townie after getting out of the service, but never got the dirt out from between my toes. Found this site when I went looking for information to help get an old Allis Chalmers back on its feet and working again.

Got a running WD45 some years ago, serial number says 1953 best I can tell. It was not pretty and shiny, but the thing cranked, fired up, and ran like a top, and I used it to hog some banks and cut in gardens for others in the neighbourhood and around our little town.

Last job I did, the right rear wheel managed to find a chunk of cut-off t-post fence steel sticking up about 8 inches, buried under a lot of scrub and tall weeds. Ripped the rubber, eventually blew the tube but not before I made it back home and parked it. About the same time I wound up being quite disabled (arthritis got REALLY bad) and poor Allis got the short end of the stick. I drained the fuel tank, drained and refilled the crank, pulled the plugs to put some Marvel in there, removed the battery, did what I could to mothball the old girl. Tarped it tight, and she sat under that tarp out back for quite a few years.

My nephew got some land, and I gifted him the tractor. He had a little one, but it isn't nearly enough machine for his property. Needs something with some meat. I had been keeping the crank loose (spun it by hand every few weeks), popped an electronic ignition module in there, and did a few odds and ends as I could to keep it from going to the mud-daubers.

We winched her onto a flat-bed, took her out to his place, and he got busy, with my cranky and stiff-fingered help. We've got it running sweetly now, got a hydraulic leak fixed, there is a radiator on order to replace the corroded and plugged original, and it's lubed up. Wiring harness and odds and ends are getting tidied up as well. She will be in really great shape, all things considered, but ...

She still has that ripped-up right-rear tire. I long-since found replacement rubber (tire and tube), been hanging in the shed off the ground. Of course it went with the machine when I gave it to him. We're just plain stuck getting the rim adjusters loose and the rim off the confounded drive wheel. The camming bolts on the wheel adjusters are absolutely WELDED in there, by rust I guess.

We've used ATF and acetone, several commercial rust-busters, pneumatic impact drivers (fairly BIG ones), a 5-foot pipe on a breaker-bar socket wrench, candle-and-heat, a percussion driver (socket, driver-dingus, smack it with a sledge hammer), and a propane torch to heat the bolts, but the consarned things will NOT budge. I thought I was going to snap the breaker bar off at the pivot this morning, but those things will not BUDGE.

Is there ANY advice on getting these things off so we can break the rubber off and put on the new(er) tire? I'd love to hear it, and you-betcha, we'll likely try it. I'm just about to the point of getting the cutting torch in there and just buying new adjusters....

Hope to hear from y'all. Thanks in advance.
 

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Hello and Welcome.
I generally unbolt them from the wheel centers. Then take a big hammer and pop the center till it comes loose.
If the hammer doesn't knock them loose ad pry bar to the mix. Rust likes to hold them together.
Drop them in a bucket of used motor oil for a few weeks. Then try some rust breaker with a big hammer, flame wrench,
and that long cheater bar you've been using and you'll likely get them freed up.

Edit:
If you just need the tire changed and don't plan to adjust the wheels I would do what R.J. suggested.
I've had tire dealers come and put tires on tractors with the wheels in place. Well worth their fee.
If you need to take the wheel off the center the clamps have to come off. Not just loosen.
I found this video that shows how to remove and repair the clamps.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Also, if you need the rear tire changed out before you can get the wheel broke loose,
that can be done as well. We had some trouble getting the rear rims broke from "Ole Rusty"
A John Deere G Project tractor, that me and my Nephew has been working on, and we had a local tire instillation place come out and install new tires. He just left the rear rims on the tractor, jacked up one side, took his hand tire tools and unmounted the old tire and tube, and remounted the new tire and tube, aired it up, let it down, and repeated the other side. Dave is giving you the right advice, if it absolutely has to come off.

20802
 

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Dave and R.J. covered it well. Welcome to ATF!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
PERFECT. Thanks. Searched all over and just never found this one. This guy is great. No sugar-coated laboratory-style repairs here. Some folks show tearing an entire engine down and never get their hands dirty, never have to reach or search for a tool, never skin a knuckle. I prefer seeing the real deal - dirt, rust, 'Where the heck did I put that wrench?' and all.

We'll be getting to it as soon as the weather clears, and I'll post the results if I can.
 

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Hello, welcome to ATF. I enjoyed reading your post.
 
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