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Discussion Starter #21
Today I was finally able to take out the dash board which was retained by the steering wheel and the throttle, and both were fixed by rusted pins which had to be drilled.
Now I have to study the instruments, buttons and try to find out which are original. I have been unable to find a pic of an original dashboard. Maybe somebody could help.
I like to rebuild the dash before any other item because a functional dash helps me to check other items of the tractor when I refurbish and reinstall them.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Good.
Let´s take a look at the dash. I think I can save the ammeter and maybe the oil manometer. Also the starter, the lights´ switch, the shutter handle and the stop handle seem to be salvageable. The water thermometer is not original as it is in french and from Jaeger, an european make. I will try to find one from Autolite.
21020
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I would love to see a pic of the original dash light which has been smashed just over the ammeter.
I would also like to know what the lower center hole is for.
Now let´s take a look to the back of the dash. Lots of dirt and rust but most items remain probably useful. All cables, electric or not, will have to be replaced. I have taken tens of pics of all the connections in order to replicate them with a new cable loom.
21021
 

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Discussion Starter #24
By the way, I was able to screw a new bakelite ball on the shift lever. No mean feat, I had to take away the remants of the threaded bushing of the previous, lost ball and refurbish the old thread with a die. Maybe not the beginning of the end, but certainly the end of the beginning.;)
21022
 

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Discussion Starter #27
This weekend I dismantled all the switches and indicators from the dash board. I have cleaned it, repaired some bumps and now is ready for filling and priming.
I also cleaned the cilinder head. As was the case with the block, it was full of iron oxid scales. I also dismantled the cooling exit of the head to check the thermostat and.... there was no thermostat!
I also took off the piston rings of one piston and cleaned the grooves. They were full of carbon. It took me nearly one hour to remove it. I will have new rings on wednesday. I expected to have the remaining pistons´ grooves clean by then. I will try some cleansing agent to get them clean faster.
I am worried about the mounting raccord for the water temperature probe at the head. It is very large and has been welded to some sort of previous fitting. I think it is not standard. I would like to see a pic of the original one.
21028
 

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Looks like someone made their own adapter to fit that French made temperature gauge. Likely welded to the original fitting.
Most of the universal fit gauges sold in my area include that 3/4" to 1/2" NPT fitting. Not sure about Spain.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Today I have been cleaning the inside of the block with some gasoline removing lots of carbon and grease. I also started taking off the piston rings and cleaning the piston grooves. It was very difficult to remove the carbon deposits from the grooves. I know that there is an special tool to clean the grooves but there is an even better solution to this problem. I am going to explain you a well known secret:
Some time after the Spanish Civil War, Colonel Arias-Paz, in charge of some Army workshops began writing fantastic technical books for cars, motorbikes and tractors. They deal with thorough technical descriptions of every mechanical and electrical item of the vehicles of the moment and their maintenance. They are well ilustrated and very easy to understand. These books have been developed in many editions. and are a must for anybody trying to understand and repair classical vehicles. In these books you can find many useful tricks for varied purposes. They are simply fantastic.
That´s how I found a drawing proposing a tool for cleaning the grooves using a piece of a piston ring sharpened and tied to a handle using wire. Needless to say, the fit of the ring to its own groove is simply perfect and the ring steel is so hard that it cuts through the carbon effortlessly. It only takes some few minutes to clean a piston perfectly.
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Very creative! I have heard shade tree, and good mechanics, talk about using ring pieces to.clean the grooves.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Today I puttied the dash board. I expect to sand and prime it tomorrow. I also removed the remaining piston rings using another trick from the Royal Shade Tree Mechanics Corps (lol).
The procedure could be officially described as follows:
1. Go to the fridge.
2. Pick a beer can.
3. Drink the beer.
4. Cut three strips of foil of the can.
5. Pry one end of the piston ring and insert the strips one by one sliding them around the perimeter.
6. Extract the piston ring over the strips.
7. Repeat steps 1 to 3 as necessary
21051
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Today I removed the mudguards. They are made of heavy gauge steel and it was difficult to remove them due to their weight. Under the left footplate there is what seems to be a sliding guide for a toolbox. I must find out what is that for.
Having removed the mudguards, it is much easier to remove dirt and rust.
The right brake lever was stuck. Some penetrating oil and grease down the greasing nipple and now the lever works ok.
The gear box is full of thick oil which amazingly seems to be in good condition.
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Looks like your moving along well. Thanks for the updates.
 

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Yes you are moving along on it nicely. Thanks for all the pics.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Well, today I finally installed the pistons with the new rings. It was not easy because the conrods are asymmetrical from front to back and I did not notice it when I disassembled the engine, so I did not take notes. I also fitted the cilinder head with the gasket. Next thing I plan to do is to install the oil pan, but first I have to do its gasket.
I have also started to paint the inside of the dash just to find out a proper red color matching the paint remnants in the tractor. Lacking a RAL code for the Massey Harris red color, I am considering the red color used in the first Massey Fergusons like the MF 35 which were painted in a dull red shade, but in most pics I see MH tractors painted in fire red, RAL 3000.
I have also disassembled the seat, which is fixed by two circular plates, all of them being quite corroded. I still have to figure out how to fix the seat and the plates.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
By the way, have you got any secret recipe to dissolve and remove old grease from the tractor? I am wasting too much time trying to remove old grease in the axles and in some other places. Even rotating wire brushes are almost useless because the wires cut through the grease and most of it remains there.
 

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If you can cross reference it, the Ditzler PPG paint code for Massey Harris red is 70837.
I have heard some folks say they have had luck using oven cleaner to remove the grease.
I've only used cleaner- degreaser and lots of rags.
 

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Discussion Starter #39
After a short trip to the north of Spain, I resumed the restoration this evening. I jacked up the rear axle and I was able to turn the right wheel but the left one was completely blocked. I opened the transmission to check the differential but everything seemed in top condition.

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So I suspected that maybe the right brake had seized, so I started dismantling it and as soon as I began to extract the levers, the brake released the wheel. However, I do not like the sound of the wheels when they turn. Is is a grinding sound. I think that I am going to check both brakes (not easy because of a rusted woodruff key that holds the closing plate in place)
Thank you Dave, the oven cleaner seems a good idea. I will try it and let you know.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
I am trying to figure out how to remove the main wheels. They are fixed with a huge nut with a recess that probably keeps some sort of locking device.
Any idea about how to remove it all?
What sort of wrench can remove a nut about 10 cm, four inches, wide?
 
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