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To get the nut off you will need a big pipe wrench or if you don't want to mar the sides use a monkey wrench. ( also known as an automotive wrench)
Measure from flat to flat to find what size you need. You'll also need lots of penetrating oil, a big hammer, a torch, a puller, and likely a cheater bar for the wrench.
Once you have the nut off...build, rent or buy a puller. The threaded holes are for bolts or threaded rod with nuts to pull the wheel.
I would use no less than a 2-1/2" x 1-1/2" steel bar across the end of the axle. Drill holes a size bigger than the rod but match the location of the threaded holes in the wheel.
use a couple of washers between the nuts and puller bar. Makes it easier to turn them. I would also add a washer and nut behind the wheel for extra support.
Once you've let the hubs soak in oil for some time put some pressure on the wheel then beat, heat ,turn nuts, spray more oil, repeat.
Depending on the rust factor it may take a while to get them loose. Also if you can drive the keeper out with a drift punch that would help.
Once you get them both moved to the end of the axles drill a hole on the center of your bar at the axle center and use a threaded rod and nut to finish pulling them off.
At least that's how I would do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Removing dry grease and manure from the inside of the wheel, I found this:
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It seems that the keeper is a sort of long woodruff key which goes in a groove all the way through between the wheel and the axle, blocking any rotation of the wheel related to the axle. In the original parts book of this tractor, there seems to be a long woodruff key which might be fixed with a pin to the axle. Not clear because my copy is very dark and blurred. But it seems that there is no need to touch the keeper, just remove the nut and extract with some sort of geat as you described, Dave.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
And these are the brakes:

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As everything in this tractor, the brake chambers were full of dry manure and rust. I cleaned the drums and blew the chambers with compressed air wearing a filtered mask to avoid problems with asbestos dust, very common in the brake liners years ago. I have already cleaned the right brake, which stands on the left of the pic. The liner is somewhat glazed and damaged but remains effective. If the tractor were mine, I would refurbish the brakes at least with new liners, and with new drums and cams if I could find a replacement. I will ask the owner about what to do with the brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #45
One more observation for tonight. This tractor had a clean and well kept tinwork, but the innards were full of dry manure. The problem with dry manure is that it is very difficult to remove because it sticks fiercely to any surface. But the worst about it is that dry manure is very hydrophilic, it absorbs humidity very efficiently, and somewhat acid. And that acid humidity corrodes whatever the manure sticks to unless it is well protected by a good coat of paint.
So, if I had to load manure regularly with my tractor I would wash the whole vehicle, including all the nooks and crannies, after every shift to avoid the rust and rot I am finding in this otherwise incredible machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
This is the inside of the panel closing the brake drum chamber. Observe the manure crust. The corrosion below was terrible.
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Discussion Starter #47
The blacksmith of the village had a set of wrenches for locomotives. One of them fit the 70 mm of the wheel nuts perfectly. It made short work of both nuts. By the way, yesterday I put some penetrating oil in one of the nuts but forgot to apply it to the other nut. I have to say that the nut with the oil went out like a dream and the other was much harder to remove. I did not have too much faith in this sort of stuff until today.

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This isthe wheel axle with the nut removed. As you can see there is a Woodruff key inside. Tomorrow I will try to remove the wheels using the extractor you suggested, Dave. The blacksmith is doing it today.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
The dash panel with a firstcoat ofprimer. Not enough, though, there is some pitting which is still noticeable. Some more primer-filler will solve this issue.

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Discussion Starter #49
And the brakes ready for assembly. See the corrosion suffered by the right brake. The reason for the difference with the other brake was a missing screw which left an open slit through which manure and rain could get into the brake chamber. The hole for the screw was filled with rust and manure. I cleaned it up and reworked the thread. A new screw was fitted which closed the slit.

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Discussion Starter #50
First primer coat at dusk, just before two days of thunderstorms and heavy rain. Hence the canvas ready. I cannot take the tractor in the shed mainly because it has no front wheels, so I guess I am a sort of reluctant shade tree mechanic. While the storms last I will refurbish the exhaust, coil, distributor, starter motor and generator.

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This first primer coat is a very thin one, intended to pinpoint remnants of dirt, grease and manure. But for the time being the tractor is under a canvas.
 

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Making nice, steady progress. Good job!
 

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Discussion Starter #52
I like to give a good coat of paint to the areas which are going to be hidden by things like the generator, starter motor and filters before attaching those items to the motor block.

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Today I installed the starter motor, the generator, the coil, the exhaust/intake with the carb and the oil pan. All of them refurbished and properly painted I am having some trouble with the distributor which I hope to fix tomorrow. I also did the gaskets for the exhaust and for the water intake of the cilinder head and fitted the screw with the water temperature probe.
If I fix the distributor and make the cork gasket for the valve cover tomorrow, I might be ready for the first attempt to start the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Disaster.

The axle of the distributor was seized, like almost everything in this tractor. The owner of the tractor insisted in solving it by himself and destroyed the distributor yesterday.

Appalling.

Now I have to find a distributor for a Continental F162. Originally it was an Autolite IGC 4005, but now it had a french SEV, so I guess that there is a variety of distributors which might fit.
A couple of pics with the current situation of the tractor.

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Discussion Starter #55
The radiator screen. Repaired and primed. Works flawlessly thanks to the welding abilities of my friend Pepe, 85 and still going strong!

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Discussion Starter #56
First paint attempt. It has swallowed a 1 Kg can of vermillion red or fire red, RAL 3000, and I couldn’t cover half of the surface.

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Discussion Starter #58
Well, here goes a new update.
I finally instaled the oil filter. No mean feat. It was impossible to find the proper fitting for the bottom of the filter because it required a 1/8 NPT thread. Impossible to find anywere around here. So I bought one with a 3/8 BSP thread and made a new thread. This arrangement goes down some more centimeters than the previous, so I had to lift up the filter to make some room and refrained to install the second mounting ring of the filter. You can see the filter when I was distmantling the tractor and the final result.

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Discussion Starter #59
When I cleaned and removed the rust and paint of the gas tank, I detected many small holes in the bottom. I decided to try to close them with some brazing. I am not too sure about the wisdom of this method. Maybe I should have used Nural 21 paste. Any suggestion regarding this will be much appreciated.

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Discussion Starter #60
It´s amazing how popular tractor restoring is among my friends. Even though no one of them has ever been involved in farming. Here is my friend Carlos, former general manager of one of the most important banks in Europe and now happily retired, cleaning the gas tank. Doctors, judges, lawyers, business men, politicians, engineers... some even arrive in dungarees.

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