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Stuff just happens unfortunately. You have come.a long way on it, and you will get there.
 

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Discussion Starter #82
I have spent the whole week working all day long and all I could do was to visit the tractor when I arrived home. So, today I decided to advance some work on it no matter how late. I had picked the front wheels with new tyres so I lifted the front axle to install them. Then the hydraulic jack sank in the ground and the whole tractor veered to the right. I saw it coming and nobody was hurt.

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I lifted the front axle very carefully again and installed the new wheels. Then, the whole tractor slipped again from the jacks and went backwards straight to the shed because I had not engaged a gear or braked it. I was not about to see the tractor blasting the new shed doors so I got a hold at the front of the tractor and used my 100 Kg as an anchor. The tractor stopped. If I had not been overweight I had never achieved it.

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It was a bit scary, but no harm or damage was suffered. Tomorrow I will try to tow the tractor to its original location.
 

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Glad neither you nor the tractor was hurt. Stuff like that is something that you will remember, and hopefully it will not happen again.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
Yes it was a close call and a pretty good lesson. The problem was that the right side of the hidraulic jack sank into the ground. I will restore the Cropmaster inside the shed. It has a concrete floor which is much more load resistant than soil. I intended to restore the MH 102 jr inside the shed as well but is a rather big beast, summer weather is fine here and that is how I became a shade tree mechanic.
Today I came home early and made some progress. I installed the auxiliary fuel tank. These tractors started on gas and once warm the fuel supply was shifted to kerosene or distillate. It is said that the samples which arrived in Europe were adapted to run only on gas. So the aux tank was not used here. Anyway, now the aux tank is useless. It has so much corrosion at the bottom that if I had to use it, I would make a new one. I had to remove a huge wasps´ nest from the inside, I painted it and installed it.
I also finished the installation of the main tank. It took me some time to align it with the openings at the sheet metal cover and I had to guess how to fit the metal straps. When I restored the MF 65, I took some few pics before distmantling it. When I started with this one, I took about a hundred pics. I swear that before I start restoring the next tractor I will take thousands of pics. You cannot rely on memory when you have to deal with so many parts.
And I installed the radiator once again! However, the upper intake needs some touches and a gasket to avoid trouble.
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It starts looking like a tractor!
 

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Discussion Starter #85
On friday I filled the radiator with water. It had a huge leak because the brazing between the head and its base had open. I dońt know which sort of brazing or weld it is but is soft like lead. I have limited welding resources, so I opted for using Nural 21 cold weld and I am very happy with the results. The radiator frame had been welded or brazed with the same material and was half loose. I had to remove the frame because the leak was just under it.
Now I had to replace the frame and I called the welder of the village. He told me that the weld or brazing used was an old technique which was no longer used and told me to use an industrial adhesive. I was quite reluctant to follow his advice, but having no other option, I conformed the frame to the head and bottom of the radiator and used Nural 25 to fix
it. It hardens in 10 minutes, so I had to hurry to put the adhesive and fix the frame properly
in its place. I have to say it seems solid as a rock. I filled the radiator with water and there was no leak. So I installed it once again (seventh time or so...).
I also installed the choke cable using the old handle, a new shutter cable, the dash light (I recovered the base, but the shroud is missing and I am wondering what to use to replace it) made the wiring of the water temp gauge and cleaned the light switch which remains a bit of enigma for me.
I have also started to remove the rust of the tinwork.
 

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Discussion Starter #86
I have some doubts regarding the painting of the tinwork. These doubts already arose when painting the MF 65. The fact is that once I painted several sheet metal items of both tractors, the paint cracked under the gloss varnish coat. I had a talk with the owner of the paint store where I buy my supplies and he told me that the solvent of the top gloss coat had attacked the paint. He told me that there is no need to use a gloss top coat with current paints.
But a friend of mine with a huge experience in motorbikes restorations has told me to apply a top coat in every restoration.
Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter #87
This weekend I restored the throttle and the exhaust and gathered several distinguished local members of the Royal Shade Tree Mechanics Society to make a new attempt at starting the engine.
No way.
We believe that the coil and/or the spark plugs are defective, so we are going to change both because the sparks were weak.
In the meantime, my father, 87, made a good job cleaning the tin work of rust and dirt.
The radiator is at last fixed and does not leak anymore.
The tractor looks impressive.
Next weekend we will make a new starting attempt.
 

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When that engine fires up for the first time it will be a relief and an exciting moment. Thanks for all the updates of your progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
After changing the spark plugs and the condenser, adjusting the distributor and fettling with the spark plug cables, the tractor finally started today with a powerful roar.
The oil pressure line blew again, the banjo screw of the fuel line leaked and the exhaust belched smoke like a dragon, but the engine soon stabilised its run.
The tractor still needs another set of spark plug cables with better brass plugs and a lot of fitting and tinwork but it is back to life.
 

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It is all looking good. Glad you finally got it started and its running.
That has always been the most exciting moment for me, when i
have been into a non running project.
 

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Discussion Starter #92
Well. It is friday and work starts again (now I am a weekend, shade tree mechanic).
Today I solved the problem with the oil pressure line which burst the other day when the engine started. I installed a metal reinforced hose and substituted quality hose clamps for all the chinese clamps. I also changed the clamp of the fuel line and started priming the tinwork.
 

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Discussion Starter #94
And this is the rear hood before priming:

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And after:

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I felt quite sad when I overpainted the remnants of the “MASSEY HARRIS” lettering. I hope to restore all the decals soon.
 

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Flatland Fox you need a high build primer. It will cover all of your sand scratches in the metal and you can then sand high build very easily. There also some high build primers you can apply with a special roller. Rustoleum has high build primer in your neck of the woods.Here is a link SpraygunsDirect Fixing old tractors, autos and trucks can get frustrating but the results are stunning. That old girl is is turning into a fine looking tractor.
 
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