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Here's a pic of my rotary hoe that I use occasionally to soften the hard crust that we often get after a hard rain. It will crack the crust making it easier for germinating seeds to emerge and will also kill sprouting weeds and grass.
 

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I remember those! We had some very similar to that, except we had like 6 sets that went on the cultivators. When Dad quit row cropping, we took them apart and took each section of the rotating hoes, and put them on one long shaft, built a frame for it and pulled it around in the garden after the first plowing to quote "Make it look purdy!" When I had my mobile home set up, I ran it over the yrad to help cover up the septic lines. Thanks for posting this pic, brings back some good memories!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
John, I also have a set with posts that mount on the cultivator arms of the Farmalls. ;)
 

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I know a guy that has the kind that goes in the cultivators he offered to sell me. Think I'll take him up on them. They would be handy for several situations. Thanks for the pics.
 

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Here's one I just picked up for my cub on my last road trip down south. I'm going to try it on the corn next year when the grass starts coming up around the corn. From What I've heard just put it in second gear, give her the gas and run right over the corn, although I don't know weather to believe that or not. I'll give it a try on the first row. The corn will probably only be up a couple of weeks so worse comes to worse it's easy to hook up the 184 to the fast hitch and replant it.
I'll Have to make up a bracket for it since it did not come with one.
Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kirk, all it does is crack and lift the crust. That is all it takes to kill newly emerging grass and weeds. If you lose a few corn plants, you won't miss 'em.
 

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Hello Jim; rotary hoes are still used in this part of the country quite frequently. They have been jokingly dubbed as sand fighters. Just after a decent rain with the sandy or loam soils crusted over, drying conditions and high winds bring on a condition we call Real Estate changing hands rapidly; meaning of course the sands a blowing. Rotary hoes are immediately put to use streaking the soil starting at the windward side working back and forth across the wind working down wind. It usually works. After all of the ground has been streaked, usually the landowner hooks to either chisels or sweeps and works the land solid. Sometimes a rotary wont stop the sand from blowing, and more extreme measures like a lister are then used. There is some no till here; but theres still a lot of minimum till and some maximum till. Also like in Your area, sometimes rain crusts over an upcoming crop, irregrdless of soil types; and the rotary becomes a priceless implement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Melvin, a hard rain here will produce a one inch crust on some of the land types here. Those sprouting corn plants cannot crack that kind of crust. I use the hoe mostly to break up the crust to give the plants a better chance of breaking through. With seed, especially sweet corn, being so high, we gotta do what we can to help our stuff along. ;)
 

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Jim Ya'll get a lot more frequent and better rains than we do. Almost always when a hoe here is needed for busting crust will be late spring for broadleafs like cotton. Corn never has done very well here on the higher arid plains. SSome times in early spring it will fall just right and sudan will have to have help. I think here bout a half inch crust is the max; and that would be over in the sand country; usually though hoes are more valuable here to stop wind erosion.
 
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