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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In addition to planting Mrs. Jim's kitchen garden filled with cool season veggies, we planted something new. I still hear the question some, mostly from the older generation of country folks this time of year. It goes something like this. "You get yer Irish taters planted yet?"

Well, Mrs. Jim, daughter, Grandson William, and I planted "ICE" Taters this morning while the heavens spit a few snowflakes. I don't know if it is an omen, but it was a first. Later in the afternoon, the clouds broke and the sun came out. It was still cool, but a great day to be outside, enjoy playin' in the dirt, and get a little tractor time :!: ;)
 

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I try something new in the garden every year, sometimes a couple of things. Usually just new varieties I always try a new variety of tomato out. not sure what this year will be yet.
kind of keeps it interesting trying new things.
good luck with the ice taters, let us know how they do.
 

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gordon1121 said:
I aint never planted anything in the snow before but hope you keep us posted on how they do.
I wonder ifn we will be able to get some "snow cream" taters outta them?? :!: :!: :lol:
 

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I've planted 'maters in the mud before, but not 'taters in the snow. :?
Doesn't look promising to get my 'taters in the ground this Good Friday.
It would have to turn awfully warm to dry the ground enough to disc in a couple of days. ;)
 

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Dave, I have planted most any kind of transplant into the mud. Maters, peppers, sweet taters, and too many baccer plants to count. We would wait for a "season" if possible to replant missing or dying tobacco plants after the initial planting. And if one was not finished planting, and it came a wet time when one couldn't get a tractor into the field, we pegged it in by hand.

For those that do not know, the plants in the beds kept growing, they got the water too, and would get too big to set if they were not pulled. We would put them in boxes, crates, tubs, most anything we had, and store them in a dark place, usually a tobacco barn, and try to save them for planting when the land dried. I planted many this way in the mud as long as I could get through the field without getting stuck. Trying times for farmers are the norm.
 
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