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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I been trying for 2 years to get some of these chickens very rare and hard to find..I finally found a pair in Arkansas and the woman shipped them to me..Big story behind these birds is a old man found them in a barn back up in the hills of Ky in the 1800s.. do a search on Ky Specks and it will tell you all about them..So happy to get them..



 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
A lot of people don't know about this rare true bantam breed so I am making this thread to raise awareness about the breed here's some of the history of the breed it is said that they have been around since the 1800,s but know one can say for shore about 75 years ago a man found the specks in a barn in Kentucky hence the name Kentucky specks the man started to really organize the breed. The specks are slightly larger than OEGB and it is said that they where breed to brood OEGB eggs they for family groups and cocks usually get along with each other there different comb types including rose and straight no one can say for shore where there origins are
 

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They really are pretty and have an interesting history. My poultry knowledge is very limited. Most all farm families here had a few chickens when I was young. They free-ranged, the modern term, and returned to the coop at night to roost. A chicken might be lost once in a while to a preditor, but I don't remember it being a really big concern. If one is gonna have them here now, they have to be penned. There are too many varmints that want them for food :!: :eek:
 

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JR, I am convinced that anything that you set your mind to you are going to become as well versed and rounded in the subject matter as anybody coming and/or going. That is awesome. My knowledge of chickens goes about as far as a carton of eggs or when my wife fries it (like tonight :D) but I love to learn. Congratulations on obtaining these - I've never seen one like them and the history is really something else. Thanks for sharing and good luck with them! If you could get into them and get some young started no doubt you could do well with those too. I always enjoy seeing the poultry posts (or any other post) in these forums, there's always so much to learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I can't believe hen laid 2 eggs put in incubator got 1 to hatch and today I found another pair right here in Ky going in a few to pick them up :) make me 2 pair now.. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
At some point, Roy Stacy's father acquired a farm in Kentucky that either
already had them or he brought them to the farm from elsewhere. There you
probably had a "founding effect" on the gene pool of the specks, where you had a
relatively small population that had only a few characteristics. In this case,
they probably carried the mottled gene, so these may have developed a somewhat
consistent appearance just from having started from a small founding population.

Then you had a 3rd phase of development under Roy Stacy. Unlike the first two
stages, this one had more human selection than natural selection. From what I
can gather, Roy took these bantams from his father's farm, where they had been
breeding naturally. He decided at some point to standardize them. Since Roy does
breed OEGBs and does quite well with them, I would guess that his efforts to
standardize the Kentucky Speck was influence by his expertise with breeding
OEGBs and, since he had a lot of OEGBs, he probably used them as a genetic
source to bring in or reinforce the characteristics he wanted in the Kentucky
Specks to have before he introduced them via the American Livestock Breeds
 
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