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Well I figured I would start sharing some of my tractor stories. For the record these stories are as accurate as I can make them for the moment though I will add other details if I do think of something.

ANYHOW I think I will go in order of acquired. That means starting with “Big red” or “the big grumpy red tractor” the Farmall Super MTA
Sadly, as far as I know so far, there are no early pictures of this tractor. The oldest I have are from 1999 which I will post later in the story. Also the information I do have about the tractor is limited and many specific variables I do not know. I will just let yall know that from the start so please excuse it. I will tell this story to the best of my knowledge

So. Chapter 1: "Big Mean Red Machine" The story of my 1954 Farmall Super MTA

East Bell county, Central Texas. I believe near Zabcikville. About all I know about this tractor in it’s early years is it was used to pick corn and was owned by a Banker by the name of Willard Green. I do not know if he was the original owner or not. I also do not know when the Saginaw (Credit to Luke) 3 point hitch was equipped.

Sometimes in the late late 1960s or early 1970s I believe my great grandfather purchased the tractor. I was always told it came around in the 70s sometimes but I think it is possible to have been the late 60s. I think this was either his 2nd or 3rd tractor. Wanting to move round bales with the tractor it was possible the 3 point was added by my great grandpa but I have no record of such a event as I do not have a record of the purchase of the tractor. Anyhow the attempt to move the bales using the tractor didn’t work out so great and the tractor enjoyed not doing much of anything sitting in the shed with a certain 1955 chevy (that is another story) although it was repainted at some point along with the 730 D if I remember correctly (that JD had the bale moving job but I don’t know if it came before or after the farmall)
Short of the bale moving for the cows the only other agricultural activity going on about this time that I know of (I don’t know when they stopped doing the hay either. I suppose they just hired it out in the later years) was the garden which was handled I think entirely by the JD 1050 (so 1982-1992) My great grandfather died in 1992. My Dad started growing produce probably mid 90s and selling it. What does this have to do with the MTA? Well the MTA was pressed back into service for some tasks such as hauling the tank trailers and some 3point work. I do have one picture from this town. Year unknown just late 90s sometimes.

What was attached at the moment we can only wonder. I do believe the 1050 (sitting to the right of the MTA) was probably pulling a transplanter. MTA was likely on water duty as you can see the yellow water trailer (to the left of the MTA right next to the building) if you look real close. From what I understand the MTA did not come over to this location (my great grandpas house) very often although it does happen to show up in one other picture. Probably taken about the same time.

Again I have absolutely no clue what it was doing which is why I assume it was at the same time as the picture before.
It continued carrying out odd jobs around the places for a few more years as shown in this early 1999 picture.

Where we find it hiding out to the right of the 55 chevy behind the shed. Needing more storage space the shed was having a addition added to double it’s size. The MTA was coming to the end of it’s service though. This was likely soon before the end. Sometimes in either 1999 or 2000 the tractor suffered some sort of ignition problems. The tractor somehow was getting out of time and every attempt to fix it did not work. (looking back now I think it was a combination of built up carbon, partialy off timing and a rich gas mixture) My grandpa looked at it one Sunday afternoon but before he could ever take another look the farmall was dumped down the hill north of the shed out of sight out of mind and replaced with a 1978 JD 2840. They lacked the time to repair it and quite frankly it seems my dad was just fed up with it in general. The 3point and a few other usable parts (and for some reason the lightbar mounted tool box!) were taken off and put into the shed. Looked like the end for this tractor.
The 3point got a new home on a certain 1944 M (featured in the next story) and I remember my grandpa driving it over and getting it. Do not recall the MTA being in the shed at the same time so it must have been dumped already.
As time went on the tractor still rested down that hill next to a also retired IH side delivery rake. The produce company later shut down and the farm was abandon for most of the rest of the decade only having the 2 JDs antifreeze checked every year and the 1050 sometimes started and taken to mow somewhere else.
This picture taken 2007 (by yours truly) shows us how the tractor was at the time. This was the first time anyone had even thought about the old farmall in a good while.

My dad just called it the “red bomb” but never cared to talk about it. “don’t mess with that red stuff. Stick with Green”
Now about 2007 at about the same time me and my grandpa discussed finding a way to move the tractor to his place and get it going “unless there is no rain cap on it. Then you have a lot of water in that engine and I don’t want to mess with it (if he could see himself now haha) We never could though find a way to get it out of there since we had no trailer . This was the first attempt at what seemed would never happen.

In winter 08 we returned to the farm and happened to be building a new fence straight next to the MTA. I each day went over and looked it over. Fence went up around it and a building behind it. It seemed to look increasingly worse with each passing day. At about this time a old manure spreader I had lying around was restored (this being my first restoration)


(I can dig out a little better picture later)
and I joined this forum in October. Looking around the forum at restorations done it seemed like it would be possible to restore this tractor. I had after all been saying I would someday restore both that tractor and that truck.
“right…” it seemed no one else agreed with me too much however. After a while I suppose of annoying my dad about this he said I could move it in the barn and work on it “although it is not going to run” About this time it started raining a lot (gee wish it would now!) so I didn’t have a opportunity to attempt pulling it out until later.
Here is how it sat 10/30/09




In the mean time I did try to do something on it. I got the farmall M’s old hitch assembly from my grandpa and mounted it on here (as the MTA’s is not on the M)

As it dried a little we tried pulling it with the 1050. Wouldn’t move at all. 1050 just spun out. I suggested using the 2840 (which had just plowed the previous day) and it just so happened to have been ran low on fuel and would not start. After getting more fuel and repriming the engine ( my dad did not enjoy having to do such a task for such a purpose) we were off. The 2840 moved it but as I recall the right wheel was not turning. Regardless it left that resting place of almost 10 years on that day 11/28/09

Until it got hung on a tree because of that locked brake


Sure enough though after unlocking the brake we had it in front of the shop just before Christmas (December 23) where we see the MTA and 55 chevy back together for the first picture since 99


And by golly one tire was holding air! Not the rears though…they kind of made a loud KABOOM when such was attempted. Quick side not to clear something up my dad at some point along the way decided I could put the tractor in the back of the shop if I cleaned it up.
I was told after we got it inside I was not to take that tractor apart until that spreader was finished. It appeared the suspense was killing us all (including my dad) as we took the hood off for a look that night.
http://s835.photobucket.com/albums/zz27 ... 0_7620.jpg


After borrowing we the 1050 battery and hooking it(it was converted to 12v during the produce days) up we tried the starter…only to discover the engine was STUCK. Being new to this I was kinda upset about the fact but folks here on the forum told me it was not that uncommon to have such a problem.
After soaking with ATF/Acetone/mystery oil for less than I leak I think we had the engine broke loose. It really was not stuck bad.

*side note: about this time a 1939 AC B had shown up at my grandpas place. As almost a response my other grandpa bought a 1949 H at the beginning of 2010*
But so the game had begun. It seemed my dad had gained some interest in such a project. Or atleast decided it wouldn’t hurt to mess around with it, although no one was still a believer that this tractor infamous in its later days for being constant trouble would ever run again.
Things moved along however

MY grandpa seemed to have gained interest after getting that little AC. Although lacking any buildings to put the things in the M which had been there for over 25 years gained a red friend at some point. 1941 H.
For some reason I found that this song http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GSGmXAsK ... DB0D436EA3 seems to go well at this point.


Meanwhile back at the shop

(you can dig back in my youtube to find vidoes of this as well)
Although side projects went on as well



First primer



And things started to go back together











For a good while progress stopped. Didn’t last for ever though

And at this point we finally got to the first coat



It was high gear to get it ready for the coming show!



Toolbox I mentioned earlier which was painted and had the decal put on thought I never mounted it. Still on a shelf in the shop. I need to put it on since it is original to the tractor.







New radiator and more parts.

Also at this point things had really grown at my grandpas even with the purchase of a new truck simply because we wanted to haul tractors easier




Old battery box deemed un useable

Shes looking like a farmall again


Finally at the cost of $$1060 the super MTA rode on new rubber since the first time since…..54??


I had to sit on it for a picture. Yes I did catch some heck from some IH people for wearing the JD shirt in this shot. It just happened ok?

It was soon time for the first start up in over 10 years (it was 2011 at this point)
After fixing some leaks that always love to show up I got the distributor on and gave it a shot. Pulled that starter as my dad stands watching. Suddenly POW. It backfired. Just like old times apparently because my dad was not to happy saying see I told you so. “just let me give me some time to tinker with it. Ive never timed a engine before” so I adjusted the distributor. Pulled that lever and choked. And sure enough that MTA roared to life. That cursed never running tractor was back and better than ever.
http://youtu.be/KkG4yDgXC9w

The look on my dads face was priceless. He didn’t waste any time hopping on and taking it for a ride either. LOL

Looking back though my dad didn’t like this tractor at first and didn’t believe in it it was apparent he got to liking it later on. He enjoyed painting it I know. The project never would have been possible without his help of course. I had no way of paying for all of it and I couldn’t take on such a task solo. The tractor made its maiden voyage for the October TEDTEA show in temple texas. I would say she turned out just fine wouldn’t yall?





Not only but the old MTA gets to turn that black dirt once again


And go on the annual tractor drive where she was one of the best looking tractors there




At the moment the MTA is hanging around in the shop keeping those JDs in line. The 2840 and 1050 are both still around but now they have to share the shed with the most prized thing in all of east bell county.

I truly hope yall enjoy this story as much as I enjoyed writing it. As for now it is after 3am. I have been writing this and digging up pictures and dates for the past couple hours. Im am heading off. Thank you so much for reading and of course to everyone else who helped me along the way. My friend the Masseymechanic being one of those people.

Next story to come: “The reliable but stubborn M”
 

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Great story Ray thanks so much for sharing
 

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Thanks guys! That means a lot :D

Going to do atleast the M story at some point today. Not quite as long or anything but it does have a story behind it. Then the AC B will be next up. Although we have only had this tractor for a few years it is very important and you will see why ;)
 

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Chapter 2: “She Always Starts” The Tale of my 1944 Farmall M
This tractor likely originated in the Taylor Texas area. I believe the original owner just used it as a row crop tractor like it was meant to be but as for any specific tasks or details I do not have any.( I do belive the engine was rebuilt once though) I do know this however. In the 80s my grandpa bought a 15 acre tract of land near Troy. The land was overgrown with weeds that were as tall as a MTA. He needed to find a tractor to handle the task of clearing this and something a little older seemed like the best bet.
My uncle having a M might have talked my grandpa into getting one. When my grandpa was growing up they had a BF avery and a MH so he did not have any previous experience with a farmall that I know of. It may also have just simply been what he found. Either way the Taylor dealer, I believe at the time was called Bigeon Equipment, had a farmall M listed. The tractor sat in a barn with a mounted bedder. The owner had died some time before and the tractor had been sitting around there for a while. The dealer didn’t believe it would start but my grandpa wanted this tractor so they put on a new battery through in a little gas and it fired up. $900 including bedders and the tractor was on the way home on a actually snowy winter morning being towed with a 77 chevy and tow bar.
At some point soon after a rotocycle bush hog was acquired as well as a grader blade that mounted on the front of the tractor. A little later my uncle let my grandpa have a different set of bedders (the two side ones it has now. My uncle still has the rear one but does not use it) and a graham hoeme chisel plow. My grandpa decided to paint the tractor sometimes after he got it and he did so at my uncles. There was one picture of it painted but we can’t seem to find it anywhere. Anyways the bedders were painted with it and have not been off since the late 90s. Since the tractor had to live outside under a pecan the paint didn’t last forever.
I was born February 4th 1997. When I was little I always liked going for rides with my grandpa on that old M. There are plenty pictures lying around of me with tractors but this one is the most relevant.

That is me on the left looking at the tractor and my cousin is on the right. I remember one ride on this tractor my grandpa had to keep stopping and letting water out of the fuel bowl. After that he kept a can on the gas cap too not just the exhaust pipe. The muffler was often off to help in maintaining the orchard. I also remember another ride a little later on the tires had gotten kind of muddy and my grandpa said” this is the way to clean tires” and we took the M out in road gear.
I never did drive this tractor myself until one day when we were unhooking the shredder. My grandpa asked me to drive the tractor back and park it. Having never driven any tractors but the 1050 before I was pretty nervous. However I did it and soon I was driving it around “just to charge the battery” Later I started chiseling with it after school.
In more recent years many other tractors have shown up and other implements. The M left its traditional spot under the pecan to move next to a new tractor shop. Sometimes it even gets to stay inside. After all those years the M is still working keeping the place mowed and plowed. I have done a lot with this tractor and driven it over half the country. It is always ready to go when you need work. Due to the status of being a work tractor however it never seemed like it would be possible to restore it lacking another tractor to do the work. That all changed yesterday with the purchase of a JD 730 D. Though the M will be back to work after it is restored it at least can be now.
On a side note as long as I can remember this tractor has ran kinda funny. I rebuilt the carb and had the mag redone but it still runs the same way, through it now starts better than ever.
Im sure I have left out parts of this story. If I think of anything else I will let yall know. To finish this up though how about a few pictures?
Where it used to live



Playing with a new rake after a auction. Remember the 3 point mentioned in the MTA story? This is that one.

Going for a ride…in a rain storm

Though not always inside the M was for this picture. Normally it stays right outside that door

The M at work



Next up “Little Al” The Allis Chalmers B
 

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Ray I just read & keep reading your story,how wonderful for you to take time out to share your story. Well written ,was so interesting and great pics that made it come to life right in front of you while reading this .Thanks for sharing this.
 

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bettyp said:
Ray I just read & keep reading your story,how wonderful for you to take time out to share your story. Well written ,was so interesting and great pics that made it come to life right in front of you while reading this .Thanks for sharing this.
Thanks a lot! :D the positive feedback is what makes it fun ;)
I just enjoy sitting here sharing the memories.
 

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bertman said:
Keep it up!!! I hope to have a story like yours one day!!!! ;)

;) AC story coming SOON
 

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Chapter 3: “Little Al. The 3 Crank Tractor”

This tractor is special to us, or at least it is to me. Not it wasn’t a family tractor or anything. Why is it special to me then ? that would will find out.

This tractor was bought new in 1939 along with I was told “a narrow front B” which I assume was actually a C. It was used near Belton Texas I believe until they moved south to Holland Texas. Tasks I know it preformed were cultivating and planting. Later on the gentleman’s grandson ended up with the tractor. It was kept in Holland in as far as I know the same shed until 2010.
In January of 2010 I had been wanting to have another tractor for a while. Even though the MTA restoration was about to start that was going to take a long time. Wouldn’t it be fun to have something else. But what? I had found a John Deere 60 but I could neither convince my grandpa to buy it nor could we haul it. Not quite giving up I was looking around craigslist one day when I found a Allis Chalmers “D” for sale with cultivators in Holland Texas…$500. Not ever hearing of a D I figured it was just a typo and actually was a B.
I had sent it to my grandpa and was at his house later that day and I showed him the ad. “Hmm well I will email them”. This was farther on getting anywhere with this than before so I was pretty excited. And waited for a reply. When one came I went and got him and then went and sat in the living room. Although I was glad he emailed them I was pretty sure we would never go even look at this. That old M had been working out on my grandpas place for years. He wouldn’t consider something else just for fun would he? For years we had said we were going to fix up that M to take it to the show but we never did. Maybe he would be interested in having something else…who knows.
Apparently he got their phone number in this reply and was on the phone for a little while taking down some notes. A little later (it was getting dark that this point) he walks in and says simply “lets go”
“go? Where?”
“ to look at that tractor” he told me. I jumped up and ran to that 91 chevy fast as I could. And we were off to Holland which was a little piece down 95.
“Why are we going tonight” I asked
“there are 3 or 4 people coming to look tomorrow. We just need to go tonight”
We arrived and met the guy at his house and walked out to the barn. He turned on the light and there it was sitting there. Dusty but in pretty good shape. We looked it over best we knew how to as he told us about it.
“I don’t really want to sell it. IT was my grandpa’s tractor and I know I could get more for it but I got to have a brake job done on my truck so it has to go” he told us and then told us about the history of the tractor. Well maybe that was later. I don’t know. I was too excited to remember.
He then proceeded to start the tractor. “Grandpa always said it would start on 3 cranks every time. He would set the throttle about here and set the choke like this”
Sure enough on the third crank that little AC roared to life. Interestingly enough I can start this tractor to this day in 3 cranks.
The next day we were on the way to Holland with a trailer we borrowed from my dad. He also had a one row IH planter that was converted to be pulled with a tractor. He wanted 200 for it and at the time we thought it was too much. This planter comes into play later however and we can get to that when we get to it. Anyways to load the tractor we got to back the trailer up to the road. The yard was lower than the road so it made a perfect loading dock.
We strapped the tractor down with a couple straps and tied a rope around the front (keep in mind this was all new to us at the time) and hauled it back home.
These were the first pictures we had of it. This one was right after we unloaded it. You can see the truck and trailer in the background

For this shot the Allis posed with the M

This tractor then after was kept under a trap near the M. It was always covered and I was not often allowed to get it out. Lol. I at some point took the cultivators off and mounted the draw bar. It never really did much work but it did run pretty dang good. Only thing we did have to do was replace the water pump which developed a leak.
Recall that planter mentioned earlier? A few months later we went back and bought that planter. It just seemed like a neat piece that would go well with this tractor, Still have the planter but I have not done anything with it yet. It is overall in good condition.


Now I mentioned earlier that this tractor was special. Main reason being this tractor was what really started the collection. The MTA was just a old work tractor that was retired. The M was still a work tractor. Neither I had at the time really considered being any sort of collection. They were just tractors. The allis was the first tractor that was actually bought just for fun and it started a almost chain reaction if you will. A little after a 1941 H appeared at my grandpas and a 1949 H at our place. Here they all were together (M was at grandpas as it rarely gets got go to shows and the MTA was taken apart) at the temple texas show in 2010.


And here it posed with another similar but restored B

We later had a new shop constructed to keep this growing collection in. At the time it had grown to 4 tractors. The M, allis and H as well as one F20. The allis being one of the less leaky tractors (in fact it didn’t leak much at all) got to go inside first along with the H


And here I am on that same day getting ready to hand crank. You can note that the cultivvators have well been removed at this point and are sitting out in the implement line. I honestly would like to put them back on sometimes



I later decided to restore the allis. Though it did not need a ton mechanically I did want to replace a few leaking seals and give it a good paint job





I later however decided not to paint the tractor. I wanted to move onto some other things and I wanted to have this allis back together again. Before I was totally finished I got a chance to buy a different PTO housing with a hydraulic pump and a rear mounted 1 bottom plow as well as a good deal of other implements and parts for other tractors.

Here it was on my attempt to mount it..though I never did totally figure it out so I saved this for another day



The allis had another water leak for a while. We finally got that fixed up recently and fired it up….and guess what. 3 cranks.
 

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Current plans for the AC include mounting the cultivators again. About the only thing at the moment. It will be going to the show this year and i want to have cultivators on it.

Next up Chapter 4: The story of the "Bad H"
 

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JD2840 said:
Chapter 3: “Little Al. The 3 Crank Tractor”

This tractor is special to us, or at least it is to me. Not it wasn’t a family tractor or anything. Why is it special to me then ? that would will find out.

This tractor was bought new in 1939 along with I was told “a narrow front B” which I assume was actually a C. It was used near Belton Texas I believe until they moved south to Holland Texas. Tasks I know it preformed were cultivating and planting. Later on the gentleman’s grandson ended up with the tractor. It was kept in Holland in as far as I know the same shed until 2010.
In January of 2010 I had been wanting to have another tractor for a while. Even though the MTA restoration was about to start that was going to take a long time. Wouldn’t it be fun to have something else. But what? I had found a John Deere 60 but I could neither convince my grandpa to buy it nor could we haul it. Not quite giving up I was looking around craigslist one day when I found a Allis Chalmers “D” for sale with cultivators in Holland Texas…$500. Not ever hearing of a D I figured it was just a typo and actually was a B.
I had sent it to my grandpa and was at his house later that day and I showed him the ad. “Hmm well I will email them”. This was farther on getting anywhere with this than before so I was pretty excited. And waited for a reply. When one came I went and got him and then went and sat in the living room. Although I was glad he emailed them I was pretty sure we would never go even look at this. That old M had been working out on my grandpas place for years. He wouldn’t consider something else just for fun would he? For years we had said we were going to fix up that M to take it to the show but we never did. Maybe he would be interested in having something else…who knows.
Apparently he got their phone number in this reply and was on the phone for a little while taking down some notes. A little later (it was getting dark that this point) he walks in and says simply “lets go”
“go? Where?”
“ to look at that tractor” he told me. I jumped up and ran to that 91 chevy fast as I could. And we were off to Holland which was a little piece down 95.
“Why are we going tonight” I asked
“there are 3 or 4 people coming to look tomorrow. We just need to go tonight”
We arrived and met the guy at his house and walked out to the barn. He turned on the light and there it was sitting there. Dusty but in pretty good shape. We looked it over best we knew how to as he told us about it.
“I don’t really want to sell it. IT was my grandpa’s tractor and I know I could get more for it but I got to have a brake job done on my truck so it has to go” he told us and then told us about the history of the tractor. Well maybe that was later. I don’t know. I was too excited to remember.
He then proceeded to start the tractor. “Grandpa always said it would start on 3 cranks every time. He would set the throttle about here and set the choke like this”
Sure enough on the third crank that little AC roared to life. Interestingly enough I can start this tractor to this day in 3 cranks.
The next day we were on the way to Holland with a trailer we borrowed from my dad. He also had a one row IH planter that was converted to be pulled with a tractor. He wanted 200 for it and at the time we thought it was too much. This planter comes into play later however and we can get to that when we get to it. Anyways to load the tractor we got to back the trailer up to the road. The yard was lower than the road so it made a perfect loading dock.
We strapped the tractor down with a couple straps and tied a rope around the front (keep in mind this was all new to us at the time) and hauled it back home.
These were the first pictures we had of it. This one was right after we unloaded it. You can see the truck and trailer in the background

For this shot the Allis posed with the M

This tractor then after was kept under a trap near the M. It was always covered and I was not often allowed to get it out. Lol. I at some point took the cultivators off and mounted the draw bar. It never really did much work but it did run pretty dang good. Only thing we did have to do was replace the water pump which developed a leak.
Recall that planter mentioned earlier? A few months later we went back and bought that planter. It just seemed like a neat piece that would go well with this tractor, Still have the planter but I have not done anything with it yet. It is overall in good condition.


Now I mentioned earlier that this tractor was special. Main reason being this tractor was what really started the collection. The MTA was just a old work tractor that was retired. The M was still a work tractor. Neither I had at the time really considered being any sort of collection. They were just tractors. The allis was the first tractor that was actually bought just for fun and it started a almost chain reaction if you will. A little after a 1941 H appeared at my grandpas and a 1949 H at our place. Here they all were together (M was at grandpas as it rarely gets got go to shows and the MTA was taken apart) at the temple texas show in 2010.


And here it posed with another similar but restored B

We later had a new shop constructed to keep this growing collection in. At the time it had grown to 4 tractors. The M, allis and H as well as one F20. The allis being one of the less leaky tractors (in fact it didn’t leak much at all) got to go inside first along with the H


And here I am on that same day getting ready to hand crank. You can note that the cultivvators have well been removed at this point and are sitting out in the implement line. I honestly would like to put them back on sometimes



At some point about this time i needed to move the F 20 we had bought. It had mounted bedders and all the tires were shot. sure enough though i hooked the allis to it and put it and low and it pulled that F20. a tractor weighing twice as much as it did. I began to call the tractor "Little Al"

I later decided to restore the allis. Though it did not need a ton mechanically I did want to replace a few leaking seals and give it a good paint job





I later however decided not to paint the tractor. I wanted to move onto some other things and I wanted to have this allis back together again. Before I was totally finished I got a chance to buy a different PTO housing with a hydraulic pump and a rear mounted 1 bottom plow as well as a good deal of other implements and parts for other tractors.

Here it was on my attempt to mount it..though I never did totally figure it out so I saved this for another day



The allis had another water leak for a while. We finally got that fixed up recently and fired it up….and guess what. 3 cranks.
 

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On your plow the piece that goes underneath needs to go in the front set of holes behind the wheels.
I usually use the top set of holes on the bracket but the bottom set has to have a purpose. The rockshaft does not look right somehow will have to look at mine.
Interesting storys though.
 

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Alright thanks for the help. ;)

Sorry about the double post by the way. was going to edit one detail and i must have pushed quote instead
 

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Wow, you all did a great job, you should be very proud, and being able to spend time using them makes it that much better. CONGRATS on some fine work. Remember, if it's green in your field you'll have red in your pocket, but if it's red in you field you'll have green in your pocket. Enjoy the tractors :D
 

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Excellent story Ray. Told very well, so you must have been listening in your English classes. :D :D You seem to have a natural ability for narration AND great mechanical aptitude. A perfect combination for the workforce, just what employers look for.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
zippy1 said:
Wow, you all did a great job, you should be very proud, and being able to spend time using them makes it that much better. CONGRATS on some fine work. Remember, if it's green in your field you'll have red in your pocket, but if it's red in you field you'll have green in your pocket. Enjoy the tractors :D
:lol: i like that one!

Thanks a lot! Ill be typing up a few more of these sometimes they probably wont all be as good being these were some of the more special tractors but ill see what i can come up with
 

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Discussion Starter #19
missouri massey man said:
Excellent story Ray. Told very well, so you must have been listening in your English classes. :D :D You seem to have a natural ability for narration AND great mechanical aptitude. A perfect combination for the workforce, just what employers look for.

Thanks a lot! :D

Dont know how much of that listening part is true though! :lol:

Couple more coming up sometimes. Just in the crunch time with the show coming up at the moment so no promises of when yet
 

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Discussion Starter #20
gordon1121 said:
Ray I can't beleave I missed this post when you put it up. I read it today and really enjoyed the story and pictures. Thanks.
I am glad you found it now! Glad you enjoyed the stories and thanks a lot for reading! :D
 
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