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Well after running about two weeks late we finally got the tobacco in the ground today. Got reminded no matter how much you get ready you aint but everything went pretty well and its in the ground so it was a pretty good day.
Here is the green houses where I bought the plants. He has a pretty good setup and good plants. You can see the mower they use to mow the plants as they grow. This guy downsized from 225 to 125 acres this year.





Giving everything one more check. I know I'm going to be setting with a John but my hat shows where my hearts at.



That little bottle in my hand is over 100 dollars. Its Ridomel ( not sure of the spelling) keeps tobacco from getting blue mold. Most people spray it on the ground but we put it in the setter water does just as good and don't use near as much.



Here's the plants ready to go.





Melinda and her mom setting together for the first time in probably 12 years but they still got it.





Brandon got relagated to following the setter which if you get behind a good crew turns into a lot of walking and a little bending which is a good thing.



Remember when I said you aint never all the way ready well the 1 1/2 fitting I picked up this morning to hook my new hose up to the water pump should have been a 1 1/4 so instead of starting the pump and counting to 5 we gravity feed the old bucket and filled the water barrel. When I grew up we dammed up a spring or dipped it out of a pond with a bucket and after a couple of barrels I remembered why we bought the pump.



Anybody remember seeing if you had enough water for another round?



Got my daughter in law into the act and she did really good. I guess the torch has been passed except for the official tractor driver.





Jim if you read this don't get mad on the copyright infringement for the trays on the fenders. sure does work good. :)



I aint one to throw anybody in but guess who got to over see and tell a lot of stories about how it used to be today.





But they did keep the plants ready and the trays cleaned when they had time.



Told Melinda this was the prettiest picture she would take all day and she laughed. :shock:



Brandon sure did want to ride the setter but after I ran over his foot with the back tire of the tractor we figured it was better for him to walk it off. :) :)




Here it is done so now all we gotta do is see if it grows. Sure would have liked to had it out a couple of weeks ago but it should be fine.



Along about sunset this evening we had this maybe its a good sign.



Guess I was wrong about the prettiest picture too.
 

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Gordon, all looks great and I am glad you got 'er done! The plants look like strong healthy ones. What size cell trays were used? I also like that they were not clipped too close. We had some once that were almost nothing but stems. They did not plant good. Growers are still planting here, and they are having trouble keeping their plants mowed down in the houses because they are so late.
We never used Ridomil, and really only would have ever needed it once. And wouldn't ya know it, it was year before it was developed :!: :eek: We had severe blue mold in the fields after planting in 1979 because of too much cool and wet weather. NC State, in cooperation with other sources further south, had a blue mold forecast and monitoring network for years that tracked the disease as it moved north from Latin America and the Carribean Islands.
 

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Thanks Gordon ,great pics, really enjoyed seeing them .
Brings about lots of good memories when we use yo raise tobacco.
 

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Gordon,
Loved the pictures. Brings back memories of using similar equipment to plant cabbage. Nice rolling ground you have. Great to get the young folks involved in setting those plants.
Regards,
Chris
 

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Hey Gordon, regarding the plants on the tractor fenders, I did the same thing when planting as well and set trays all over the hood. We put trays in the planter trays and pulled the plants outta the cell trays as we set them. You gotta remember, my old Long was, is, not as shiney as that Deere, so wearing a little more dirt was just part of its job. I had pics on the old forum of us planting and maybe some wet, cold day I can find them.
Now for a question, if you have to spray, you gonna put backpack sprayers on Brandon and his bride :?: :?: :?: ;)
 

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When ya got it done, it's a good day. :cool: Apparently you all didn't get any of the rain Friday, from about noon, and all day yesterday, like we did here in the middle of the state.
I was kindda curious too on how many and what size trays you planted. Sure brings back memories. Setting was always the most fun part, always had plenty of family show up to help.
Never had the pleasure of filling with pumps, but four buckets goin' fills them pretty fast. ;) Your Dad and Father-in-law have done hard farm work long enough to deserve the light work. And you gotta have a couple of older folks sittin' around when you're setting tobacco saying, "Remember when we was kids........." or "When I was you're age.........."
It's a state law. :mrgreen: :lol: ;)
 

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Never thought about it Dave, but it also must be a state law in NC! It always was the case with most farmin' chores, and always was the story about walking to school in all kinds of weather, mostly uphill, BOTH WAYS :!: :!: :!: :!: :shock: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Jim & Dave . work on the farm was never as bad when the families and neighbors all
got together and helped each other out. Even the women folks would come and help cook.
Those were the good old days that are mostly long gone.
 

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I always appreciate the fotos and info on tobacco. I have seen tobacco in the field only once, over 50 years ago, consequently I know very little about the crop. All the fotos and comments are a new learning experience here.
 

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Gordon, what an awesome chronological report on the art of tobacco setting. You all got it down to an art form. It's great to see all the generations involved with the process. A grand crew indeed. Never knew a thing about tobacco until I started listening to you, BigDave, Jim and MissBetty right here on ATF. Great pictures of a wonderful family working on an awesome property !!! My hat's off to you sir, and thank you.
 

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Chris and Betty I'm glad you all enjoyed the pictures. Doing it brings a lot of good times back for me also. We always did it as a family and those big dinners from the women folk will never be forgotten.

Jim and Dave the trays were 253 count and I set 30 even and I'd say they averaged around 250 to the tray they had a real good stand. The plants had a good stem with plenty of tops left and a great root system so I hope they'll take hold and do good. Some people say 27 trays set a acre some say 37 and the guy I got the plants from sells 33 trays for a acre. It all depends on how you got your setter spaced and the width of the rows. UK calls for around 9300 plants to a acre with 16inch spacing and 40 inch balks. The best I could tell I had about a acre plowed and left out two rows so drive the tractor down to spray and they were setting three trays to two rows where I left them out so that would have made all 33 trays set if I had planted them. The setter was set on 16 inches but 42" to 44" rows was as close as I could get with the tractor I used so I figure we set around 7500 plants which will cut around 1250 sticks. The guy sells them for 250 dollars a acre and for that its hard to justify doing it yourself. As far as all the facts and figures from above I'm sure you both know what figures on paper very seldom works out the same in the field.

Dave your right about the state law but you have to earn the right to use it and I'll have to say they have I just wouldn't admit it in front of them and Jim I hadn't thought about it but I might just set those other two rows and leave the sprayer in the barn and see if I can find a couple of the old metal sprayers that about as much as the five gallons off water you put in them and get Brandon and Kayla fitted up. Its been many years since I heard that old pump squeak every time your right foot hit the ground but I think everybody should at least once. :) :) :) ;)

Wendell and Mig I hope you guys do enjoy even though I do get carried away with the pictures I hoped the people who never saw it done before might be intrested in seeing it and as the year goes on I'll probably bore people a lot more with them.
 

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I do appreciate it Gordon; I find a lot of crops raised in different areas than here to be fascinating. The same type implement You are using was at least to an extent used with potatoes and sweet potatoes. The local museum has one that was used with sweet potatoes.
 

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glad to see your done hope you get great growing conditions now we are at a stand still has been heavy rains for last 4 days even the tilled sand is saturated funny how the finger planters developed 50 to 60 years ago basically remain the same as new ones built today by Holland and mechanical
 

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Never had any tobacco raised in my area. Never realize just how much work it is to raise it from start to finish
 

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Gordon, lots of burley was planted in the NC mountains in spots of just a few tenths of an acre, much like a garden. I have seen farmers and workers using backpack sprayers many times.

Big flue-cured tobacco growers that often have mechanical harvesters also have self-propelled high clearance sprayers. Both of these eliminate the need to have skipped rows for a tractor mounted or trailer sprayer.

I skipped every fifth row to allow for spraying and harvesting. With my row pattern, one acre of land actually produced only .8 acres of tobacco. Our aveage plant population was around 6000 plants per acre. A lot was set at 22" apart in the row.
 

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Jim since I am the senior member of the Davidson clan I have a different request for the two extra trays. First I would like to set a couple of rows in Brandon's watermelon patch and not use any spray on it at all.My dad would always save 2 rows of tobacco for his chewing tobacco and mix it with a plug of days work for his chewing. I am not sure but I believe that I could still twist a mean chew of tobacco. Now chewing is one habit that I never took up I did try it a few times to no avail. I have been so sick that when I would lay down on the floor It seemed like that the whole world was turning upside down I have had surgery many times had lots of little of little pain pills but never have I had a trip like that. So much for the rambling but if Brandon don't let me set the tobacco in his watermelon patch I have enough room left in my garden to put out a couple of rows and not only can we have chewing tobacco we can see who can still tie the best looking hand of tobacco. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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Don, with 500 plants, I think you could easily be making twists all winter. :lol: :lol: :lol: I knew a neighbor farmer when I was growing up that would twist and chew his own baccer. He stored it in the packhouse, and if my memory is correct he flavored it with honey, molasses, or maybe even Karo syrup. It seems he would age his for some length of time. I remember being there with him once and he had right many twists, and they seem to be organized in some way.
I never chawed any either. I just was never interested in even trying it. I had heard the tales about getting sick.
I did play little league, pony league, and some school baseball. Most of the players chewed some, still I just did not participate.
Speaking of melons, we planted our late patch this weekend. I've never planted any that late, but with this year's season so silly, they could be the best ones. We'll see about the middle of August. ;)
 
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