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I got a question about plugs. We have a 1963 2000 Ford which for as long as I can remember has run H10 champion plugs and the last few years we could only find H10C which I figure has something to do with copper core. The plugs used to last for a good while but the past few years will have to be changed every year and if we use it a lot have gone through two sets. I have herd that with today's gas the heat range needs to be changed to help the life of plugs. My question is this can someone tell me how many ranges to change to help with the life of the plugs and still keep good power?
 

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I'm sure that this junk gas that we have today could have an effect on the plugs, however just like many things today the quality of product is in question too. Last year I replaced plugs on my Ford due to a miss. Fired it up and still had a miss (yes I changed the points as well before hand) To make a long story short a brand new plug out of the box wasn't work at all. Switched it out and was fine. I too have noticed that plugs just arn't as good as they used to be :(
 

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i think a range hotter would help. I run H12 ( 512 ) in my machines.. and actually.. mostly I've switched over to autolite 437 thought the 216 xref from the h10 works too..

changing plugs 2x or yearly? OUCH! do you have an air compressor? if so, for the price of 1 set of plugs, get to harbor freight and buy a abrasive plug cleaner.. lil softball sized job that has an air hookup and a push button.. has a lil bag you fill with black beauty abrasive ( included ).. and a rubberized hole to stick plugs in. takes a 15-20 second shot of air as you agitate the device to get the abrasive moving around. I've had one 5-6 ys and still on the abrasive that came with it.

have a cloth to wipe the plug threads down, and a can of carb spray with a stray to spray clean the abrasive that makes it up by the inner electrode.. DO clean it all out or it will wear the engine.. once clean.. regap and go. I clean all my plugs now.. I keep a bucket in the garage.. when I pull a set I toss em inthe bucket.. when the bucket is full, I take 10 minutes and clean em all, and repackage them back in their lil boxes that I have saved over the years. I always have a a few clean sets on the shelf when needed to do swaps, so i'm not tied up cleaning a set on demand. probably have oh.. i dunno.. maybee 10 sets of plugs for various machines in boxes, cleaned and gapped and ready to go... havn't bought a new plug in years. did get lucky about 5-6ys ago and when tsc dropped champion to switch to autolite, I bought the metal champion display case.. actually got the case/dispenser for free.. manager told me if I bought al the plugs in it I could have it. must have had 38 plugs in it.. I got them for 50 cents each clearance.. so 19$ for all them plugs and a wall display case!! cleaned plugs have a marker cross mark ont he box, new ones don't.. thus I know if I am pulling a cleaned or new set off the shelf.
 

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Try the Autolites that SouNdguy mentioned. I've had better luck with Autolites than anything else in the past few decades.
I just use a pocketknife, emery cloth, and rag to clean mine and regap, 'till the electrode burns down into the insulator in 10 or 15 years.
That's why I say decades. I don't buy many spark plugs. Each of my tractors get about 250 to 300 hours a year of use.
 

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yep.. we are saving a good bit of money cleaning and regapping and reusing. have you seen plug prices lately. can burn 10$ for plugs at a pop. if doing that 2x a year..! ouch!
 

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Try putting a dab of "anti-sieze" on the threads when you install them. Makes it easier to get out next time. Got in the habit with aluminum heads and found it works on steel too.
 

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Having worked for Champion Spark plug in the past, I'll tell you what I know. Unleaded fuel funs cooler than leaded so all plug heat ranges were adjusted to a hotter plug no matter what the brand they are. The H10 was replaced by the H10C when copper was added to the center electrodes of plugs to make them more resisitat to cold fouling. Your tractor would use a H12C now. Champion plugs have anti sieze on the threads when they are new.
 
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Same here. Autolite 437's and I've been cleaning them with a HF blaster as well. Same plugs for about 4 years now. Runs great. Clean em twice a year. 10 minute job.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks very much for all the advise. Next time I'm in Lexington I'll pick up one of the cleaners didn't know they made such a thing but sounds handy. Always ran champion in ford vehicles growing up they seemed to last better but like you all say things change. May go ahead and pick up a set of the autolites to. Thanks again.
 
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gordon1121 said:
Thanks very much for all the advise. Next time I'm in Lexington I'll pick up one of the cleaners didn't know they made such a thing but sounds handy. Always ran champion in ford vehicles growing up they seemed to last better but like you all say things change. May go ahead and pick up a set of the autolites to. Thanks again.
Good luck Sir :cool:
 

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I've been running the 437 autolites for years with out a problem. I did pick up a few boxes of champion H10C NOS at a garage sale cheap and will probably use them when I run out of the autolites. I'm running NGK's in my puller and are happy with the results.

Kirk
 
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