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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone,

Let's restore a John Deere D (ser.#34441) :p

I bought the old deer at a Belgian classic tractor dealer and brought the tractor to Luxembourg.
Unfortunately, I don't know much about the history of this tractor.
I only know that he was in an auction in leola (2008)



I saw him in this state for the first time at the merchant (in Belgium)



If anyone of you has info's on this tractor (34441) I would be very happy to know them :!:
The tractor was offered as restored. But each of us knows that this is always dependent on the eyes of the owner.
Shortly you can follow the restoration here... ;)
(As usual with lots of pictures and surprises)


 
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I cant wait to see this one! :D
 

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I agree Derrick, I've been hoping to see this restoration since seeing the quality work Tom does, and he asked about finding a manual for it. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello,

Thanks !
It gives me pleasure to read that someone is interested in our restoration. :p

Here are some pictures from the transport of the old deer.
(No wonder, for the steering wheel side of the truck.
The truck came from the The Swiss Army, they have the steering wheel on the “wrong” side)





Unloading from the truck.
Unfortunately, the truck, (at this time) had no ramps, so he was transfer on our wagon.





And here the deer in our “Deer-clinic”... :lol:









At first sight everything looks good, but you'll see that appearances can be deceiving.

Soon more photos in detail... ;)



 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hello,

Some details about the old deer.
You can get an idea of what work awaiting us. :eek:









































































 
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Looks like the Deere has the steering wheel on the wrong side too. :?
What some people called restored most call freshened up, and he didn't
even paint the wooden plug, or screw or whatever it replaced. :|
Some things you just have to laugh at. Lots to do and not anything taken apart yet. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Hello,

prwttsh said:
At least the nail is green ;)
He is camouflage. :lol:

That's not the only one nail ! :eek:
I discovered another one in the transmission which is installed there. :twisted:
Concerns the wooden plugs, I don’t know, as yet, why they are mounted there.
Or why someone has drilled holes in the case. :?

Before purchasing the Spoker, we have decided to rebuild the Spoker to the last detail.
So I can not tease me about such repairs :mrgreen:

So much for "Restored"
It applies rather like Dave said : “Freshened” :!:


But wait, it gets even better!

The previous restorer has used beer cans for repair. :lol:
 

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Tom,
Looking forward to your pictures and details of the restoration process on the "D". I am not a Deere man but the work you do is truly awesome and your shop is great.
Regards,
Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Chris,


Yes, we are lucky to have such a workshop. This simplifies a lot our restorations. ;)

Sugarmaker said:
...I am not a Deere man ...
:?: :?: :?: Why not :?: :?: :?: :mrgreen:

I'm kidding, it would indeed be uninteresting if all would love the same thing. :cool:

 

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My dads first tractor was a A or a B, he traded for the Allis WD in 1949 or 1950. I wasnt born till 52 so I never saw it just a few pictures. Almost was a Deere owner a second time too. When Dad wanted a bigger tractor he had the local Deere dealer bring one to the farm. I think it was a 3020 but could be mistaken, we had it for a week or so. That was about 1972. Seemed like a nice tractor. Dad shopped around and settled for a Ford 5000. We got a lot of work out of the Ford. I am sure the John Deere would have served us well too. Maybe some day:) I will try to pay attention and learn some thins about John Deere's.
Regards,
Chris
 
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Right off the top I am not a big Deere fan but that is a crying shame. That is in no way shape or form restored. Patched and pedaled would be more fitting. You can cut a lot of corners on these oldtimers and make it work but make it look good in the process. Did a lot of corner cutting on my 1938(see 1938 John Deere D posting) and it is not anything close to restored. Put back together so as it would work. Most of the internal components came from newer model tractors. When I first saw the pictures of yours I was kind of wondering why you wanted to take it right down and redo it. Makes perfect sense now. I just shake my head at people who, like I said, patch and pedal things. Keep the pictures coming. This is going to be one very interesting restoration. Just wondering what other weird and wonderful stuff you will find once you get into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi

@Chris
Thanks for the info.

@masseymachanic,

“Patched and pedaled would be more fitting” :lol:
I did not know this formulation.
But true to one hundred percent :!:

I followed your post, you had saved the work with the dismantling. ;)
But you did a great job. Congratulations !!!

My D is almost completely disassembled (we started the restoration in 2011).
so all the surprises would have happened,
at least I hope so. :mrgreen:
 
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I have only been able to find one gliche in your restoration project. :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: :eek: Not near enough pictures of the continuing process. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: Please keep us updated and by all means get pictures. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Hello,

... Please keep us updated and by all means get pictures ...
;)

Let's continue with the picture show ! :D

Today the deer's feet are amputated ... :eek:













And now the surprises! :evil:

Front ...



These are not the beer cans!! :lol:
I wonder why not suitable bearings were used


Rear ...





I think, I don't need to say that there is very much clearence beetween the axle and the wheels. :evil:




 
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:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :shock: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll: What some people will do.
 

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In defence if good old human ingenuity, drink cans do make good shim stock. :cool:
I don't know what tractor it was, but as a kid I remember seeing an old tin Coca-Cola
can formed around a splined axle like yours to take up the clearance. LONG time ago,
tin cans haven't been used for drinks here, for about 45 years. That's about how long ago I saw it.
I have used aluminum cans to make shims at work when I was out of the proper sized shim stock.
Lots of escalators, moving walks, and lifts in the region have a piece of can in them somewhere. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hello,

Thanks for the explanation. BigDaveinKY
Previously one has helped with the funds that they had.
However,I do not assume that the previous restoration has been so long ago that they had to work with such funds.

Coming back to the rim

The front one.







It's not the photo that is warped! :eek:
There are the wheels that are no longer round.

Inside ... :twisted:

Hooray, we have found the beer cane. !





The wheel hub also have some side inclination ... :|





... and finally ..

CRACKS :!: :!:





The search for new wheels could so begin.

It should also be noted that the rims from the Spoker-D are different than the rims of the following model D









 
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