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Just got back from a quick getaway to the original Capita of Md. They were a propriatary colony set up to grow tobacco by Lord Baltimore. Real interesting and learned a lot. Couple of pics of a reconstructed plantation on the site.
Inside tobacco barn

Reconstructed house

Log that had been hollowed out to make a cider press.That was a new one on me. They chop up the apples Use a mallet type tool to crush them and there was a small hole at the end of the log for the juice to run out.


This was a tobacco field that was being farmed by an Amish farmer. You tobacco farmers tell me I had never seen it in what I would call ricks like this before?

View from the deck at our hotel


These are from Point Lookout Used both during the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and housed confederate prisoners during the later. The light house is suppose to be haunted!!




Just a couple more of the Amish workin their land

 

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Love the pics Mike . That big field of tobacco ,cut and on the stick looksso familar to me . Seen a lot of that . Sounds like you all had a wonderful time. Thanks for sharing those.
 

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Mike, you were surrounded by lots of beautiful scenery. Thanks for sharing your views with us :!: There is a little burley grown around here since the tobacco buyout, but the largest grower in the area has given uo on it. He cannot get the weight out of it he shoud. He usually grows about 200 acres of flue-cured tobacco.
 

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Jim in NC said:
Mike, you were surrounded by lots of beautiful scenery. Thanks for sharing your views with us :!: There is a little burley grown around here since the tobacco buyout, but the largest grower in the area has given uo on it. He cannot get the weight out of it he shoud. He usually grows about 200 acres of flue-cured tobacco.
Jim those rick looking things was that a normal thing when it was cut? Also what do you mean by flue cured? Remember never had anything to do with baccie. :lol: :lol:
 

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bettyp said:
Love the pics Mike . That big field of tobacco ,cut and on the stick looksso familar to me . Seen a lot of that . Sounds like you all had a wonderful time. Thanks for sharing those.
Yes it was a great time lots of beautiful scenery and history! Both we both enjoy a lot!!!
 

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Stephenscity said:
Jim in NC said:
Mike, you were surrounded by lots of beautiful scenery. Thanks for sharing your views with us :!: There is a little burley grown around here since the tobacco buyout, but the largest grower in the area has given uo on it. He cannot get the weight out of it he shoud. He usually grows about 200 acres of flue-cured tobacco.
Jim those rick looking things was that a normal thing when it was cut? Also what do you mean by flue cured? Remember never had anything to do with baccie. :lol: :lol:
Mike, my knowledge of burley is limited, but the ricks to me appear to be nothing but stalks of cut tobacco that have been split and slid on to a stick. The sticks are stuck into the ground, and the tobacco is allowed to "wilt down" in the sun to begin the curing process. after a few days, the tobacco is hauled to the barn where it is hung to finish the curing process.

Flue-cured gets its name from curing with a heat source. The leaves are harvested as they ripen from the ground up. When I was young, it was common to prime or pull leaves, usually 3 leaves per plant, 6 or 7 times before completing the harvest. Tobacco leaves were "strung" on a stick with twine. Sticks were hung in the barn. The fires were lit and it took about a week to cure the tobacco. It would be moved out and used multiple times during a harvest season.

Bulk barns are used these days. Most are box barns. The leaves are loaded into a box, and stacked in the barn. Metal rods or pins places through the boxes keep the tobacco from steeling in the boxes and allow forced heat to pass through to cure the backer.

When I have time I need to re-post some of our tobacco harvesting, barning, and curing pics. Being small farmers, we did it more like the old ways with a few "modern" tweeks added here and there.

You might find this link helpful. Check out the Carter Farm pics at the bottom of the page. I spent many childhood days in a similar place. I cured all my tobacco in these older barns, but we used an electric stringer to put the leaves on the stick. Rockingham Co., home of the Carter Farm is just north of us.

http://www.hpo.ncdcr.gov/ctb/ctb.htm
 

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Rows of tobacco no ricks there I cut my share of it and put in the barn. Nice pictures thanks for shareing ;)
 

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Really enjoyed the pics and yes thats the way Burly Tobacco is cut. That pictute looks way to familure and was a lot of hard work. When you set your stick and started the row you never straightened up till you came out the other end. You cut three stalks out and three back put six to a stick. There used to be cutting contest every year and was a pertty big event around hear. I know you would hear about some big numbers being cut in a day but to me anybody who could cut from 130 to 150 sticks a hour not break the leaves off or split the stalk off the stick and hold that all day every day was pretty good.
 

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Mike, that was a beautiful place, no doubt. Thanks for sharing, it's really neat to see these kinds of things preserved as they once were. I wonder if anybody will ever be "preserving" the work like my father and his father before him used to do years down the road... kind of a scary thought! Thanks again for sharing.
 
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