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Steve (4imnotright) posted a question on the Massey Harris board about what kind of oil to use in his MH cream separator. One thing led to another and I remembered two Swedish made Baltic table mount separators MrsMassey bought at an auction for a dollar because no one else would bid. Oddly, these little guys sit on the corner of our porch !!! Missing all the main parts, probably never find them, but the cast bases are kinda sharp looking, complete with bell on the handle to help you count your rpm's.

There's the little bell...and if you can read on the handle it reads "70 per min."

Pretty cool decal, I think. Anyone heard of this brand ??

Here's a McCormick Deering that lives in the garage next to MrsMassey's Mustang.

Needing a little TLC, coming up in the waaaaay distant future.....maybe.

Sooooo much junk....Sooooo little time :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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An electric McCormick Deering separator? What wil they think of next? Our separator was strickly hand crank, so I got to crank it most of the time when I was a kid. I always kind of thought that I was born at the wrong time as my 2 older brothers always seemed to escape the cranking on all the things we had that needed cranking, and my younger brother was too small so I was stuck with the cranking. We didn't get electricity until 1950, but even then we didn't get an electric separator.
 

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Dick said:
An electric McCormick Deering separator? What wil they think of next? Our separator was strickly hand crank, so I got to crank it most of the time when I was a kid. I always kind of thought that I was born at the wrong time as my 2 older brothers always seemed to escape the cranking on all the things we had that needed cranking, and my younger brother was too small so I was stuck with the cranking. We didn't get electricity until 1950, but even then we didn't get an electric separator.
We were lucky, my uncles being DeLaval dealers, before I came along the crank separator was adapted for use with a belt drive electric motor. I used to go with one of them on service calls when I was a little guy. I remember helping install the vacuum lines, the vacuum pumps and working on the can coolers that had refrigeration units dropped in from the top and kept the water churning and 33 degrees. Good for chilling down watermelons !!!

Yeah Dick, but just think, all that cranking gave you a set of arms like Popeye I bet !!
 

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Stephenscity said:
Really didn't know such a thing???Junk part I mean ;) :lol: :lol:
"Junk" in my vocabulary is and endearing term, kinda like calling your wife "honey" or "sweetie". Now Mike, I don't mean ME calling your wife honey or sweetie, I mean YOU calling her honey or sweetie !!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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We had a fire one time and as I was heading up the steps there was a large landing where the staircase turned to the right. There was something shining hovering in the air there, didn't know if it was an incendiary device or alien or what :? Got some better light on it and turns out it was a McCormick Deering cream separator with the bowl highly polished :lol: The guys saved the house too :cool:
 

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Nice looking pieces. Ok. someone educate me. :? Why use a cream separator ??
Grandma and Mom just let it sit, separate naturally, and dipped the cream off the top.
 

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BigDaveinKY said:
Nice looking pieces. Ok. someone educate me. :? Why use a cream separator ??
Grandma and Mom just let it sit, separate naturally, and dipped the cream off the top.
The separator was much faster and if you were in the cream shipping business, it had to be separated right away, dumped into the cream cans ready for the cream truck pickup. I spent many hours of my younger days cranking separators. Worked with a model 2S IH much like the one in the photo. Electric drive was optional but we never did get it installed on the IH. Got a newer Delaval and it was nice not to have to crank the machine by hand anymore.
That unidentified one in the first post has very familiar logo that reminds me of Delaval. I'll have to check mine and see if it is similar.
 

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BigDaveinKY said:
Nice looking pieces. Ok. someone educate me. :? Why use a cream separator ??
Grandma and Mom just let it sit, separate naturally, and dipped the cream off the top.
We used to sell pasteurized whole milk back in the day. About the time I came along the government was beginning to get more heavily involved in the process and did tests called "bacteria count". If your bacteria count was too high, your milk couldn't be sold, or at least you would be docked and given a lower price per gallon. Using the 5 gallon milking pails that were hand carried and poured directly into milk cans through strainers increased the bacteria count because of all the exposure pouring from and into other open containers. The milking pails were stainless steel and enclosed with a bail that held on the assembly with the 4 teat cups that drew the milk via a pulsating vacuum. (Kind of a crude description and I'm sure you dairy farmers out there are getting a laugh just about now) :D :D

To minimize the percentage of bacteria, bulk tanking systems were employed. This eliminated the carrying and dumping of pails because the milk was drawn directly from the cows into 2" glass tubes that then carried it to the bulk tank. At the same time, milking "parlors" were becoming the norm instead of all the cows just standing in individual stantions with you dragging the milk pail from cow to cow. The parlors allowed one cow to stand locked in, the udder rinsed and milked making the process much cleaner.

If you opted to not invest in these expensive parlors and bulk tanking systems, you could still separate the milk, sell the cream and fatten up hogs on the skimmed milk. The criteria for cream was much lower than that for whole milk and you were paid a higher price for it too. Every week we'd load up our 10 gallon milk cans full of cream and take them to the Frisco RR depot and ship it off to St Louis.

We, of course still pasteurized our own whole milk and skim the cream off the top each time the large mouth gallon jars were removed from the refrigerator.

So Dave, I'm sure there are other reasons, but ours was one of economics, not wanting to invest in the parlor. We enjoyed a higher price for cream, though a much lower quantity of cream as compared to milk, but the benefit was a superb fattening process for the hogs.

I have skipped a LOT of details, and I'm sure all it not perfectly correct, but the description should suffice for now. ;) ;)
 

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Ok, So they were used mostly in family dairy business. Grandad ran this farm as a Dairy farm from the mid 50's for about ten years.
He had the "milking parlor" for two cows, and a 500 gallon chilled holding tank, and sold the milk whole to Sealtest (local Dairy processor) in Louisville.
When I was six or seven he quit the dairy due to a hired hand incident, and turned to beef catle. Kept about four milk cows that we milked with the "milking buckets"
 

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BigDaveinKY said:
Ok, So they were used mostly in family dairy business. Grandad ran this farm as a Dairy farm from the mid 50's for about ten years.
He had the "milking parlor" for two cows, and a 500 gallon chilled holding tank, and sold the milk whole to Sealtest (local Dairy processor) in Louisville.
When I was six or seven he quit the dairy due to a hired hand incident, and turned to beef catle. Kept about four milk cows that we milked with the "milking buckets"
We had those "Surge" milking buckets with the vacuum system in later years too but if you only had a few cows to milk it was less work to just milk the cows by hand. Clean up on those buckets and cups took as much time as milking an extra cow it seemed.
 

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rusty6 said:
BigDaveinKY said:
Ok, So they were used mostly in family dairy business. Grandad ran this farm as a Dairy farm from the mid 50's for about ten years.
He had the "milking parlor" for two cows, and a 500 gallon chilled holding tank, and sold the milk whole to Sealtest (local Dairy processor) in Louisville.
When I was six or seven he quit the dairy due to a hired hand incident, and turned to beef catle. Kept about four milk cows that we milked with the "milking buckets"
We had those "Surge" milking buckets with the vacuum system in later years too but if you only had a few cows to milk it was less work to just milk the cows by hand. Clean up on those buckets and cups took as much time as milking an extra cow it seemed.
You're right about the clean up Rusty. We'd have to drop the teat cups into a 5 gallon bucket of scalding water, let the pulso pump draw in a couple gallons, then slosh it all around and pour it down the trough. Then disassemble and clean the parts. Remember having to scald all the centrifugal funnels in the separator then ringing them up on the drying rack? I hated washing all the stuff in the winter because the well house was not heated, you'd get splashed all over then freeze to death until you'd dry out. The water would freeze into a glaze on the floor of the well house...many a time causing a fall. Ahhhh the good old days. :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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rusty6 said:
BigDaveinKY said:
Ok, So they were used mostly in family dairy business. Grandad ran this farm as a Dairy farm from the mid 50's for about ten years.
He had the "milking parlor" for two cows, and a 500 gallon chilled holding tank, and sold the milk whole to Sealtest (local Dairy processor) in Louisville.
When I was six or seven he quit the dairy due to a hired hand incident, and turned to beef cattle. Kept about four milk cows that we milked with the "milking buckets"
We had those "Surge" milking buckets with the vacuum system in later years too but if you only had a few cows to milk it was less work to just milk the cows by hand. Clean up on those buckets and cups took as much time as milking an extra cow it seemed.
But, it didn't entertain the grand kids as well. ;)
When I was in seventh grade two of the milk cows came home with us. Joyce and Annie.
Somehow I got chored with milking in the mornings before school, until I graduated. :roll:
They seemed to enjoy their morning warm wash when the weather was colder. ;)
 

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We have a complete surge system in the barn, motor compressor, piping, buckets. Just needs to be cleaned up and you can go milk some cows. :D
 

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BigDaveinKY said:
rusty6 said:
BigDaveinKY said:
But, it didn't entertain the grand kids as well. ;)
When I was in seventh grade two of the milk cows came home with us. Joyce and Annie.
Somehow I got chored with milking in the mornings before school, until I graduated. :roll:
They seemed to enjoy their morning warm wash when the weather was colder. ;)
The cats found it entertaining at times. :D
 

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Interesting topic. I remember the old can cooler holding watermelons also. Not sure what the route driver thought. The seperator had fallen into disuse by the time I can remember but was still there. Before the days of widespread acceptance of margine the ammount of cream necessary to make butter greatly exceeded the need for the skim that was left so the milk was seperated and as was pointed out the skim fed to the hogs. Early margarine could not by (Michigan) law be colored. It was white with a small dye capsule in it which was broken and mixed into it. My grandparents used it and I can remember my sister and I playing catch to mix it. V ern
 

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v w said:
Interesting topic. I remember the old can cooler holding watermelons also. Not sure what the route driver thought. The seperator had fallen into disuse by the time I can remember but was still there. Before the days of widespread acceptance of margine the ammount of cream necessary to make butter greatly exceeded the need for the skim that was left so the milk was seperated and as was pointed out the skim fed to the hogs. Early margarine could not by (Michigan) law be colored. It was white with a small dye capsule in it which was broken and mixed into it. My grandparents used it and I can remember my sister and I playing catch to mix it. V ern
I didn't know that about the margarine, Vern. Remember how the hog's would fight to push one another away to get to the trough?? We'd use old air tanks, or vacuum tanks, cut them in half lengthwise and weld worn out plow shares crossways across the bottom and use those as hog troughs. We kept the butchering hogs in a large pen directly on the side of the dairy barn, where they were easy to grain feed and convenient to pour in the bucketfulls of skim milk...what my Dad always called "blue-john".

And you know what we dumped to the hogs as skim-milk was a much greater percentage of milk than what we pay close to $4.00/gallon for as milk in the store today. Most city people under 40 probably wouldn't even like the taste of real milk like we were raised on, would they ?

The picture of the cats reminded me of the same thing, Rusty. We squirted many a cat in the face in exactly the same manner !!! :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

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I remember the days of going with my grandmas to milk the family cow. Squirting the cats with milk is about the only way I can think that a cat doesn't mind getting wet :!: :lol:
 
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