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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

Having a buddy that's wanting to pack his wife into a travel trailer and roam like a nomad across the States he needed to "release the burden" of worldly possessions to fatten his wallet for the expected 20 year excursion. Only 43, they want to do this for 20 years until old enough to retire, then settle down to relax. House and property will be for sale as soon as his machinery, shop tools and other toys are sold. Another buddy and myself helped "lighten his load" a bit. The first thing I purchased at a more than reasonable price is this turn of the century metal lathe. I didn't need it, didn't want it and don't have a place for it.....but guess what....here it sits in my shed !!! Dang, I hate a bargain sometimes....

The lead screw is quite apparent in this photo as well as the steady rest and carriage. Also the 4 way in front is for rapidly moving the carriage from one end to the other while not engaging the work instead of turning the super slow handwheel.

Considering it is over a hundred years old, it is in quite outstanding condition, though the gears have a little wear and backlash. The toolrest is outdated by 30 years at least, but still quite useable. I had to remove the face plate that was on it because it was pretty rough, so now a 1.75" 10 tpi faceplate and 3 jaw chuck would be nice to find. The bed is in very good condition with few nicks or gouges. The whole rig is quite heavy with the ornate cast iron legs.

Set up to power off of an overhead line shaft, the flat-belt step pully can be seen here too. This is a shot of the very little used "back gears" which are engaged for thread cutting. Very good condition, except the lever has been brazed back on due to prior abuse...probably dropped.

This is a shot of the various "change gears" used for different threads per inch and different speeds for thread cutting. Have to have either a chart or a calculator for figuring the ratios though. By the looks of them, the majority of them have seen little use for their age.

The four jaw chuck for center turning or turning offsets looks a little worse for the wear, and the threads are boogered up a bit and have to be chased before an attempt should be made at threading it onto the spindle.

That little stub sticking out is the forward, neutral and reverser for the lead screw and the gears in front are the ones that interchange with the "change gears" for ratio changes.

The "ways" are a little worn on the carriage slide, but tightening the gibs a bit with the set screws visible in front will take the slop out. See the chewed up front of the carriage where it has been smacked by the chuck or faceplate in the past..

See what I mean about the faceplate?? Notched and boogered up to mount an off brand 3 jaw chuck has rendered this quite useless I think.

The tailstock poses another dilemma...it is neither a #2 morse taper nor a #3 morse taper. #2 goes all the way inside and #3 is to big too even enter the opening. I'm wondering if anyone out there can shed some light on what I need for this guy....

So there you have it, a bargain basement deluxe turn of the century lathe, whose destiny remains yet to be seen...I hate to pass up a deal and sometimes suffer the consequences of that affliction. Anybody need a lathe?????? :roll: :roll: :roll: :roll:
 

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i just love old machine tools! just imagine how folks would work with these all day. ive got a 1912 south bend lathe that i got to do bushings and what on for loader buckets and old tractor stuff. my kid laffs at me cuzz i dont do a program and hit run to use it like the ones in his school :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wizzard said:
i just love old machine tools! just imagine how folks would work with these all day. ive got a 1912 south bend lathe that i got to do bushings and what on for loader buckets and old tractor stuff. my kid laffs at me cuzz i dont do a program and hit run to use it like the ones in his school :lol:
Wizzard, You're right...I can't imagine 40 hours a week on one of these, but it sure is good to have for those occasional repairs nonwadays.

Mike, it does go pretty well with the traditional early American decor with the rest of the junk in my shop....
 
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