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Friday Apirl 27th 2012.

Collected two swarms. One in a Apple tree about 15 feet up, the other in a Junipher shrub about 3 feet up.

The junipher I chose to remove first and it turned out to be a royal pain. That shrub was in bloom so it was just covered with bees foraging and the cluster was mostly inside of the shrub. We decided the only good way to get them was with the vac.



We finally said we had gotten the swarm and many foragers too, loaded up for the next swarm..
Since I felt the vac was needed to get the ones out of the apple tree I needed to sit the first hive on a screen bottom board at one of our close by bee yards.
That worked but not real well as many bees freshly vacumed up were still clinging to the vent screen in a cluster and also the bottom vac box.
Got the ones from the apple tree next, told Kare I should have brought a second deep for this one.
So have decided to build a second vac set. Put the ladder platform on my swarm check list along with a set of pruners and loppers.





I must say I am very pleased how well the vac works. I am glad I took the 5 HP vac to get the shrub bees. the 2 HP just didn't have the UMP I like to suck the bees off that type of shrub. 2 HP worked well in the apple tree.

Yesterday (Saturday April 28 2012) was cold and windy. We decided that it would not bee good for the bees or us to continue the splitting and nuc building.
Instead we went out for dinner, and some shopping.
since I was going to build the second vac I needed some things. I should always always make a shopping list since I have to work with an elder mind.

I didn't get any eye bolts, remembered them when I arrived back home. This morning I remembered I havn't gotten any weather stripping seal too.

Oh well I have a nurse appointment Monday so I can stop on the way home from that to get the rest of the stuff.

:D Al
 

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Re: Well I can't find the other post?????

I never ceases to amaze me the different things that people get into and how it comes about. We'd heard that it is important to have bee keepers because so many colonies are dying out and cross pollination of crops could become jeopardized. Is it true that sometimes farmers enlist the help of bee keepers to sit hives by their fields to pollinate ?? Or was that just a story??

And Al, when you are at the Board Index, click on the "View your posts" phrase and it will pop up all you own posts. Easy to find that way... :D :D
 

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The use of a vacum is new to me also. This is a very interesting post.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pollinators are a real thing. Critus in the south and California, Almonds in Califorina, apples peaches plumbs and some cherries in Washington and Oregon. Blue berries and cranberries in the north east. Apples and cherries grapes here in Michigan. They are hauled by the semi load and off loaded in a pallet of 4 colonies to a pallet. Almonds is where they spend the big money to get bees $150.00 Per colony was the going rate this spring.
Other crops that they pay a polination fee for is squash, pumpkins and mellons Mostly in the southern states.
Two thirds of the plant food we eat is polinated by honey bees and they really are dieing at an alarming rate.
First it was a pair of mites, one we have about gotten rid of but the vorroa is still around and most of us have learned how to deal (keep under control.) with them. But then pops in a new one about 4 years ago, Nosema Creana. Wiped out 63% of our 100 colonies and 90 % of a friends 500 colonies. Not one researcher in the USA knew what we were dealing with or how to treat for it. Luck would have it we have Canadian bee keeping friends. They set us up with the university of Gulph In Ont. they told us what meds to use and how to apply it to our remaining colonies. Now we mix that med in syrup to feed them every fall and again every spring.

A nosema creana dead hive 2009. That blackish stuff is bee poop.



With me using my new set up vacum very few get hurt, It is a very low suction with the use of the pressure regulator. The hose they travel down is a smooth clear one so we cah see any opstructions. This is the bottom where the suction hose goes and the bees come into the hive.Notice it is padded with carpet pad. Also notice it slopes up at the back.Once they are out of the vacum hose they spread out inside the hive their going to live in. I usally leave them alone for 10 days once they are vacumed up.



This is the top with screen so you can open them up for ventilation. the whole area is screened.



This is the slide that closes off the top vent screen when your vacuming the bees. Notice the suction adjuster just in front of the hose partly open. Before I added the stain and the slide that adjust the vacum.





Set up for a 2HP vac and the suction adjuster more open.



The closer door for the inlet suction hose ready for transport.



This is the screen box used in the old box in a box vacum. You had to watch how many bees you put in there as about any thing over 3 pounds and the bees would over heat on hot days and die. I always carried 4 of them and you had to shake the bees into the hive after you got to the yard where you were going to keep them.



Getting stung. Of course I do some times get stung. Just today I got one on the left ear lob and two in my right hand. Was to be expected. girls were on the ground and wraped around a fence post, colder than billy hell to a bee who were also wet.
cow people get kicked by a thousand pound heifer No big deal, Horse people get kicked by a 1200 pound horse no big deal On and On it goes. But let one 250 pound man get stung by a little ity bity honey bee and they run to the house screeming like a little girl. Then when the story is told you would think the big man got mauled by a grizzley bear.
Most people have never gotten stung by a honey bee in their whole life( fact).
Most people were stung by a yellow Jacket a waspthen blame a honey bee.

A honey bee stings you once and leaves the stinger for you to scrape out they die after just stinging once.. A yellow jacket a wasp can sting you more than once, then do it again tomorrow.

Any more questions?

To find a bee keeper to collect a swarm in the USA go to your states bee org.
Kare and I are listed at MBA, SEMBA, Local USDA, County extention office, fire dept, state, county police offices plus animal control and many pest companys.

You can check out the difference between a honey bee and a yellow jacket (a wasp) here.
http://www.ebeehoney.com/beeswarms.html
 

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Al a very good explanation with photos,we have the vorroa mite here they have spread from the top of the north island to
well down in the south island,how did you get on top of them our department of agriculter seem to have given up trying to
eradicate them.
 

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I've been reading on the mites there and one of the asian bee too.
First off you have to be willing to use some type of treatment to keep the mite numbers down. With out treatment most hives will only last about 4 years. There are all different types of treatment. My student of 4 years ago with a small amount of back yard colonies has went with a work intence treatment. Screen bottom boards are a must, Started off with small cell foundation 4.9 MM instead of the normal 5.2. Dustest the bees at regular intervills with powdered sugar and drone comb that thas to be pulled out of the hive every 20 days and frozen. And a new drone comb put in the hive in its place while in the freezer.
In 4 years we have not discovered a mite in any of her 6 colonies useing the sugar roll method to get a count.
We are to big for that type of mite control. We use a chemical (formic acid the same stuff ants produce.) applied on pads in the spring once a week for 3 weeks, We do it again in the fall same 3 weeks of the acid treatment. We also use screen bottom boards. I have also been raising queens that are producing hygenic workers. Our mite counts are usally very low. In fact I have not seen a mite in any colonies we have gotten into so far this year. Still more to get to when the rain stops and the sun comes out. Like people the bees are a bit on the cranky side when it is cloudy,wet and cool.

:D Al
 
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