Antique Tractors Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Obviously leaded fuel was meant for engines of the 1940's, what octane out of the pump today is best for my 1948 C?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,471 Posts
Ill have to sorta disagree with wizz. I use and have been using E85 for several years now in my working tractor. Granted it doesnt work more than 10 - 12 hours a year, but I pour 15 gallons in, start her up and away I go. In fact, last year I sold one of my workings Ms and statrted using one that had minimal running for 6 or 7 years. She had just a little bit of sputter to her. After the first 15 gallons of E85, she had smoothed right out. It will clean, so if you have a "dirty" fuel system, you may not want to run it. I dont store any of my trcators with E85 in them, it just doesnt hold up over the winter. Anyways, octane rating is irrelevant unless you have some hopped up 500hp engine. Anything will be higher octane, and better, that what was available when it was built
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,471 Posts
Dan Robertson said:
I have had no problems using ethanol fuel but I do put lead additive in my 1951 Super C.
Theres really no need for the additives, but if it gives you piece of mind then go for it. BTW, welcome to ATF! Stop "around the Campfire" and introduce yourself to everybody!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,020 Posts
The following is a statement from one of the motorcycle sites that I frequently scan for usable information. At any rate if you have any aluminum bodied carbs or anything rubber in the fuel system, it would cause me to hesitate based on the following info. I have not fact checked it so this may be opinion and not fact.
The copied quote:

The current problem with using the 85% ethanol fuel in non-certified engines is that ethanol tends to be somewhat corrosive to some aluminum and rubber components of your fuel system. It could damage hoses, seals and erode carburetors or fuel injectors. Also, in older vehicles, it can stir up the rust and gunk in the bottom of your tank and clog your filters.

The newer E85 certified cars and trucks have been designed with stainless steel parts and rubber hoses and seals that are not as sensitive to the alcohol's corrosive tendencies.

Me again:
Now the above quote has me a little confused...is E-85 eighty-five percent OR 15% ethanol ?? All this time I thought it was 15%. I think it's poorly written myself. Disregard the fuel injector portion (lol) but the rust and gunk part is interesting. I personally don't use it in small engines or motorcycles or trucks or tractors knowing that alcohol has the propensity to attract moisture and moisture and fuel never seemed like a good combination to me. I also know a lot of guys that have NO problems with using it at all.

The reason I quit was for a couple years after it was easily available we ran E-85 in my wife's '04 Mustang. One evening it died in the driveway while entering the garage. Hmmmm...no fuel....jumped on the bike and a quick trip to town for a fuel filter. Pulled the old one off, popped in the new one and off she went. Chucked the old filter in the vice and sawed it in half with a porta-band to find it PACKED with rust. That ended E-85 use for us and until I'm sure most of the rust is gone, that car has not gone anyhere without an extra fuel filter in the glovebox. An off the wall fluke??? Don't really know.....just saying...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
Dan Robertson said:
I have had no problems using ethanol fuel but I do put lead additive in my 1951 Super C.

tetra ethyl lead was a octane modifier used in early low octane fuels available back then.

newer fuels available today are 25+ points of octane higer.

I don't care for ethanol, as it loves water.. but there's not much to do about it. PS.. alcohol is an octane modifier too.

if you wanted a lil upper cyl lube.. you could run a couple ounces of old f type or dex/merc 3 atf in your tank.

i buy the lowest octane available. octane is a method of pre-ignition ( pink, psark knock ), control. the higher the octane, the harder it is to ignite the fuel. super high octane is hard to spark and flash vs lower octane. ever see a notice on a racing pump that sells 101-104 octane fuel that says that if you fill your car with it it may be hard to start cold? that's why.

these old machiens can be hard enough to start as it is. why make it harder. :) they are low compression and low rpm, and will have no real benefit from high octane fuel. same with a lawnmower. now on a weedeater.. i might go higher octnat to preven run on adn some heat issues. besides. the oil mix in the gas is an octane mod too :)

soundguy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,471 Posts
MMM,
E85 is 85% ethanol. While I can agree with you on newer, as in like 70s and up, vehicles it can, and has caused damage to certain parts. But on these old tractors, like these with old cast carbs, its not going to hurt a thing. Yes, you may run into some problems with rust and such, but if the system is clean to start with, its not going to hurt anything. In fact, it can actually help a mildly dirty system. Say, one thats been parked for a year or so. We all know how this new gas goes bad faster than it use to. Its kinda like running B20 in a diesel engine, its going to clean things up to a point where it will clog filters and injecters. I dont use it in anything, except my tractor(s), and only put enough in that I can burn out most of it before Im done, and Ive been testing it out in my truck, which is Flexfuel, and I can honestly say I have never had any problems with the fuel causeing problems. I am guilty though, if I have say like a gallon left on the tractor tank, to drain it and mix it in with my lawnmower gas, which holds 10 gallons. I have noticed when I do that, it tens to sputter a little more, but not enough to cause probelms, and I have had to replace the fuel lines, but I cant contribute that to the E85 since its thinned out making it like E15 or something. Water can be a probelm with E85, but thething is, as with al gas, is its no longer made for long or short term storage, its menat to go inthe gas tank and be burned out in a few days time, so storage is an issue. Thats why I drain out the remainder of my tanks on the tractors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
some carb rebuild kits that have viton tipped float valves, i've noticed sticking issues.

the brass ones not so much..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,471 Posts
soundguy said:
some carb rebuild kits that have viton tipped float valves, i've noticed sticking issues.

the brass ones not so much..
I dont know that Id blame that 100% on the E85 itself. Maybe be a result of using it allowing tarnish etc to accumulate, since E85 does clean. IIRC, some of the rubber fuel lines in Flexfuel vehicles are viton because it can take the alcohol. Heck, I have them hang on regular gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,499 Posts
well.. i just typed up a huge post. board vaporised it. not going to burn my thumbs out typing in all that info again 1 character at a time on a pad that i type on. :(
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top