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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to look at some stuff that is going to auction next week and ran across some interesting stuff.

Anobody seen one of these before. Is it something used to pick up hay to load on a wagon?





Also had a odl Minneapolis Molene grinder that was belt driven.





A Dearborne two row cultivator.

 

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First one, Yes to my knowledge it was used to pick up hay and load it onto a wagon.
 

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The 1st one was called a green crop loader, it was used to pick up process peas & lucerne.
I believe the MM is a corn sheller.The one we used was driven with a TD9 power unit.
 

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There's a couple of those loaders sitting around here and we don't have the right weather to grow peas so I'm guessing they could be modified for a couple different crops. I had thought the MM looked somewhat like a portable combine of some sort. An auger for the grain and a blower for the stalks/chaff. A corn sheller makes sense but I wouldn't want to be standing there when an ear came out of that blower
 

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Thanks you all for the info. The video of the loader was good to watch. Thats the only one I have ever seen in this area. Looks like you need fairly level ground to use it. Corn sheller never crossed my mind but glad you told me. MM tractors and equipment are scarce as hens teeth around here did a search after you told me and found lots of pics. Would like to see one work.
 

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I don't really remember the hay loader but in use but it still sat rotting away. The one loading buckwheat I don't believe was coupled close enough. Around here a backstand was in use so you didn't stand near the hay being loaded. The second video wasn't available at this time. Dad's farm was not level. Vern
 

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I have loaded lots of dry hay with the same basic style loader that is in the first picture. The loader needed to hang over the back of the wagon and the flat area where the material came off could be shoved up till it was straight with the rest of the angled bed and locked into place to make a tall load. By the time we were finished a load the man at the back would be picking up material directly from the loader bed, which by then would be at your feet, and throwing it uphill to the front of the wagon. As with most things there was skill involved with building a good load that was large and stable enough that it did not shed material while travelling to the barn, especially when making the last corner onto the ramp to the threshing floor. I think our barn was about average for the main door and when the load went through the front would always rub on the top of the door frame. Ours was last used about 1982 when the baler broke and there was only a load or so left to bring in that day. The best loads had a tramper who moved around packing the loose hay while staying out of the way of the next forkful of hay coming forward. The tramper soon learned where the next fork would be going or else you ate a lot of dusty hay from your larger brothers. When only one person was on the load you tramped while the loader was bringing up light amounts or yelled for the tractor driver to halt while you caught up. I went from tramping to driving to loading as I got older and was able to take a turn on the wagon. Hard hot dusty work but swimming never felt better than in haying season. This is the closest I could find on youtube to what we did. Substitute a W4 tractor for the horses and that could be me in the late 70s. Ignore the baling and such after the loading. These boys like to handle their hay a lot of times.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2mPnAjO ... re=related
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
WyattB said:
I have loaded lots of dry hay with the same basic style loader that is in the first picture. The loader needed to hang over the back of the wagon and the flat area where the material came off could be shoved up till it was straight with the rest of the angled bed and locked into place to make a tall load. By the time we were finished a load the man at the back would be picking up material directly from the loader bed, which by then would be at your feet, and throwing it uphill to the front of the wagon. As with most things there was skill involved with building a good load that was large and stable enough that it did not shed material while travelling to the barn, especially when making the last corner onto the ramp to the threshing floor. I think our barn was about average for the main door and when the load went through the front would always rub on the top of the door frame. Ours was last used about 1982 when the baler broke and there was only a load or so left to bring in that day. The best loads had a tramper who moved around packing the loose hay while staying out of the way of the next forkful of hay coming forward. The tramper soon learned where the next fork would be going or else you ate a lot of dusty hay from your larger brothers. When only one person was on the load you tramped while the loader was bringing up light amounts or yelled for the tractor driver to halt while you caught up. I went from tramping to driving to loading as I got older and was able to take a turn on the wagon. Hard hot dusty work but swimming never felt better than in haying season. This is the closest I could find on youtube to what we did. Substitute a W4 tractor for the horses and that could be me in the late 70s. Ignore the baling and such after the loading. These boys like to handle their hay a lot of times.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2mPnAjO ... re=related
Thanks for the education and the video. Never had seen one around here before. There were still some hay stacks being done when I was younger but mainly square bales when I was coming up and did my share of that. I know what your saying about the creeks after a hot day. There was one below the farm fed a lot by caves and you could jump in that thing on a 90 degree day and it would just about thake your breath but it sure did feel good.
 

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The first picture is an "OG" hay loader, I have a working one and the second picture is a "D" corn sheller, I have one of those also. I also have literature for each of them. hth, John
 
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