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Discussion Starter #1
Did the last field of spring wheat on the weekend. I usually straight cut it with the IH axial flow but this time I wanted to see what the JD 7721 pull type would do. Swathed the field a week earlier so it was good and ready with no rain on the swaths. The John Deere pull type worked great. Probably a little slower overall than the IH due to time lost turning around on corners and finished up the centre of fields. Still, a change was as good as a rest . This video is (in my opinion) the best quality yet shot with a better camera than mine.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7W-zG-yU ... e=youtu.be
 

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My brother had a CII Gleaner and an IH PTO combine; brother ran the Gleaner and my son ran the PTO machine. Not much difference between the capacity of the machines. Some benefits to using PTO combines over self propelled for combining swaths.
 

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Uneducated question:
Is there an advantage to using a swather then a combine with a pick up header, as opposed to using a combine with a header that does both ??
 

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BigDaveinKY said:
Uneducated question:
Is there an advantage to using a swather then a combine with a pick up header, as opposed to using a combine with a header that does both ??
It is/was a common practice in the prairie country of the upper midwest to swath because of the possibility of strong winds that would shell the kernels out of the heads before the grains could mature enough. We always swathed our oats pretty green as we learned that the threshed oats then had a higher test weight than oats that were allowed to mature on the stalk.

New varieties have been developed in recent years that are not as prone to shelling as the older varieties so a lot of farmers have gone to straight cutting. However, those that raise oats are better off swathing and using a pickup header. Lots of farmers in prairie country have both pickup and straight cut headers that quick change for whatever they want to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Dick, you have it right. Swathing the crop allows any green areas or weeds to dry down in a few days and be ready to combine . Sometimes the crop takes a long time to ripen naturally unless it is cut. Many here have now turned to dessicating their crops before harvest spraying the field with glyphosate to dry/ripen the crop and kill weeds. I prefer to swath.
And with the winds we have had this fall I think any crop is vulnerable to damage, standing or in the swath. I had swaths blown apart and standing oats shelling. Flax is the next concern. Do I swath it and watch the wind blow it away or leave it stand and watch the wind break the pods off?
 

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I grew up in swathing country in Eastern North Dakota, so I swathed a lot of grain in my years on the farm. We made a swath roller out of a couple small barrels welded end-to end, with steel wheels of larger diameter than the barrel on each end, that we pulled behind the swather to push the windrow down into the stubble when we swathed flax to try to keep it from blowing away - but in a real strong wind the windrows would still blow away so we tried to combine the flax as quick as possible. Sometimes we ran the swather just ahead of the combine.
 

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Always learning something new here :!: I've never known about swathing before combining and threshing, but it makes perfect sense because of the crops and your weather conditions Rusty. This is all very interesting. :D
 

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Thanks for the education guys, not something that is done in these parts. ;)
 
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