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According to the folklore, the more black woolly worms have means the more heat they need to absorb from the sun to survive the cold of Winter.
The woolly worms in the middle of KY say it's going to be a normal to mild Winter.
Though we've already had a cold snap and snow on the ground the weather has moderated back to normal.

I took this photo about a month ago while mowing the yard for the last time.
IMG_20191015_160220 (2).jpg

Then forgot about the photo until this guy crawled up on my front porch this morning.
What it was doing out in 40 degree temperatures, or why it crawled on the porch is beyond me.
So I put it on the ground next to the foundation where it could find a good place to hibernate.
IMG_20191120_104046 (2).jpg

I don't know if it's the same critter or not. Both sightings were within 100 feet.
They have almost the same markings, with the black shorter at the tail than the head.
However, I'm not an entomologist.
 

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We saw very few wooly worms this year. I don't remember their color pattern, but I think since we were so hot and dry what few were here may have traveled northward early for the winter.
 

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Saw only a couple this year and none were the same color
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's the only two I've seen this year, and late in the season.
I agree Jim, I think the hot dry weather sent the moths north seeking cooler climate.
 
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